Portsmouth’s Ban The Burner campaigners protest on the streets in 1992

Pictured is Lyn Diaper, left, and Sue Hadnett, from Copnor Residents' Association, at the Ban The Burner march. Picture: Mick Young (2064-6)
Pictured is Lyn Diaper, left, and Sue Hadnett, from Copnor Residents' Association, at the Ban The Burner march. Picture: Mick Young (2064-6)
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Portsmouth’s anger at the proposed siting of a giant incinerator spilt on to city streets.

More than 150 committed Ban The Burner campaigners marched a three-mile route from the proposed site in Quartremaine Road, Copnor, to Guildhall Square in a display of public defiance.

The chairman of the Ban The Burner campaign Sarah Fry with some protests sent to The News Centre.

The chairman of the Ban The Burner campaign Sarah Fry with some protests sent to The News Centre.

The message to Hampshire County Council and Babcock Energy/ Scottish Power was: ‘Listen to us and stop and think again.’

Later, Ban The Burner campaign leaders travelled to Winchester to hand county councillors and Dudley Keep, the county’s planning committee chairman, a 22,000-name petition. 

Leading the Ban The Burner campaign march were Tory lord mayor Brian Read, Labour council leader Alan Burnett, Liberal Democrat planning chairman Mike Hancock and councillors in whose Copnor ward the plant would be built.

Cllr Hancock said: ‘It’s a splendid demonstration of whole-hearted support from the people of Portsmouth. It’s a clear indication of public determination to stop this outrageous scheme.

‘If the county council were to listen to the people who elected them, this thing would not be built.’  

Copnor Conservative councillor Mike Park said: ‘This shows we as a city are united in our fight. I was elected in 1986 and have never seen such enormous opposition to a proposal.’ 

Meanwhile, letters had poured into The News Centre, Hilsea, outlining why the controversial £105m burner should not be built in Quartremaine Road.

Winifred Hoar, of Hilsea, said: ‘One of the most breathtaking sights of the city is from the top of Portsdown Hill.

‘This monster would mar that spectacular view.’ 

Campaigners won the day, but around a decade later a smaller, more energy-efficient version was built in the same area.