Then and now: the four-road Southsea junction 40 years on – Nostalgia

A 1940s' scene at the junction of Castle Road and St Edwards Road, Southsea. Picture: Barry Cox Collection.
A 1940s' scene at the junction of Castle Road and St Edwards Road, Southsea. Picture: Barry Cox Collection.
0
Have your say

I know I published the older picture here earlier this year, but as I was there recently I thought you might like to see a then-and-now of this scene.

It is, of course, the four-street junction of Castle Road on the right, St Edward’s Road going away from camera, Great Southsea Street to the immediate left and, behind the building with the Barley Mow pub on the corner, the continuation of Castle Road leading to Elm Grove.

At 41 & 41a Castle Road was Parker Thomas motor dealers who ‘could supply any car’. I’ve been reliably told the building is being demolished to make way for flats.

To the left is a window of the Clock House which at this time was the home to Fleming’s antiques dealer. He remained in business for many years. It is now a hairdressers’. Look at the number of bicycles parked in St Edward’s Road.

The cars in St Edward’s Road date the photo to the late 1940s. Note the figurine on the left outside the building. The ornate lamp standards were still in place well into the 1960s. And if you look at the men on the scaffolding you will see there is nothing to stop them falling backwards. Imagine that today?

•Visit Oyster Street, Old Portsmouth, today and it is lined with fine houses and apartments, many built after the blitz of Second World War. It was not always like that of course.

At one time the street was lined with tradesmen such as those in this view showing Snook and Sons. They were a firm of egg and butter  importers. Butter I can see, but eggs? Next door is Charpentiers the printers.

Oyster Street used to run all the way from High Street, Old Portsmouth, to Town Quay at the junction with White Hart Road. Snook and Sons used to be on the right hand side of the street heading north.

The northern end has since been built over and Oyster Street now has a junction with St Thomas’s Street. That street is connected to Lombard Street thus making the Anglican cathedral encircled by the four roads.