Anger as beauty spot is blighted by dumped waste

Flytipping at Portsdown Hill
Flytipping at Portsdown Hill
Shadwell Road, North End. Picture by Google Maps

Crews are called to early morning house fire

  • Flytippers dump burned remains of a ripped-out kitchen, a sofa and bits of wood
  • Appalled resident takes photograph to show unsightly mess
  • Winchester City Council says it is aware and waste is scheduled for removal
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A BEAUTY spot is being destroyed by people flytipping.

This picture shows some of the waste dumped in Mill Lane, on the northern side of Portsdown Hill, near the Fort Widley Equestrian Centre.

It’s just horrible to see all this fly-tipping on such a beautiful site

The junk includes the burned remains of a ripped-out kitchen, a sofa and bits of wood.

The fly-tipping was photographed by a man aged 67, who wished to remain anonymous.

He told The News: ‘It’s just horrible to see all this fly-tipping on such a beautiful site.

‘It’s used by horse riders, by people like myself who enjoy walking there and by cars that travel through.’

He continued: ‘This waste wasn’t left in one day – I have noticed it has built up over four days.

‘Even cars are having trouble passing the rubbish that’s been dumped on the side and has been spilling over.

‘As and when it is cleared, it’s almost certain that fresh loads of builders’ waste will be dumped in the same spot.

‘These criminals seem to have no fear of being caught.’

This part of Portsdown Hill falls under the jurisdiction of Winchester City Council, which says it is aware of the incidents.

This rubbish is scheduled for removal.

A council statement said: ‘We have an officer who investigates cases and where we get evidence we will prosecute.

‘The government is looking at introducing fixed penalty notices to speed up the prosecution process.’

The council said that as well as being unsightly, rubbish dumped like this cost taxpayers money for removal, and could pose safety risks.

Flytipping is an offence, and changes to the law in 2005 means this can carry fines of up to £50,000 if a case is tried in a magistrates’ court.

Or it can lead to an unlimited fine and up to five years’ imprisonment if prosecuted in crown court.