Hampshire operation will tackle drug use in teenagers

Hampshire Police has set up a task force to stop young people using mephedrone
Hampshire Police has set up a task force to stop young people using mephedrone

Wallet taken from vehicle

  • Task force looks to crack down on young people using mephedrone
  • Police will work with Gosport Borough Council and substance misuse services to make parents and children aware of the dangers
  • The drug, also known as M-Cat or meow meow, was made illegal in 2010
0
Have your say

A TASK FORCE has been set up to stop young people using mephedrone.

Hampshire Constabulary is working with Gosport Borough Council and substance misuse services, such as Catch 22, to reduce the use of the Class B drug in Gosport.

We welcome the introduction of Operation Tapestry, which directly follows concerns we raised about the use of mephedrone in Fareham and Gosport.

Nerys Anthony - head of young people’s health and wellbeing at Catch 22

Operation Tapestry Action Group (Tag) will be supporting parents and carers to identify signs that their children could be taking the drug which is also known as meow meow, meph and M-Cat.

Nerys Anthony, head of young people’s health and wellbeing at Catch 22, said; ‘We welcome the introduction of Operation Tapestry, which directly follows concerns we raised about the use of mephedrone in Fareham and Gosport.

‘Raising awareness is a key part of the operation.

‘By working with professionals, we will help families and the community to understand and tackle this problem while steering young people away from this harmful trend.’

Mephedrone was made illegal in 2010 but was considered a legal high until then.

Possession of it can result in five years in prison and supplying can result in a 14-year prison sentence and an unlimited fine.

Portsmouth City Council announced last week that it is looking to introduce a ban of using legal highs in public.

An order giving the council powers to seize such substances from people found to be taking them on the streets could be imposed.

It is hoped the legislation – a public space protection order – could be extended, giving the authority the ability to hand out fines of up to £100.