Midwife who examined Gosport ‘miracle’ infant tells jury she had ‘never seen a baby so seriously ill’

A MIDWIFE who was one of the first to deal with a fatally wounded two-week-old baby has told a court she had never seen an infant 'so seriously ill'.

Victoria Brown was a community midwife working at Blake Maternity Centre, in Gosport, when tiny Stanley Davis arrived in a critical condition, Winchester Crown Court heard.

Roxanne Davis outside court at a previous hearing

Roxanne Davis outside court at a previous hearing

The tot was just 16 days old when he was rushed to the centre by his mother, Roxanne Davis – who is on trial with her ex-partner Samuel Davies, 24, of Mayfield Road, Southampton.

Both are accused of causing or allowing the death of her baby boy – on March 21, 2017.

Stanley was presented to midwives who were shocked by his condition. Unbeknown to them, the newborn had suffered 42 different fractures, including  one on the right side of his skull which caused a fatal bleed on the brain. He died days later aged just 24 days on March 28, 2017.

Mrs Brown, who has been a midwife for 12 years, told the court: 'He was incredibly floppy. He was white. He was white with a yellowish tone to him.

'His mouth was drooped open. He had no response at all. I have never seen a baby so seriously ill as he was.'

The court heard how Mrs Brown and her colleagues believed the baby was possibly hypoglycaemic or suffering from an infection known as sepsis. 

They never suspected he had so violently injured while in the care of Davis and Davies.

Davis wept in the dock as Mrs Brown gave her evidence.

Earlier the midwife told the jury how she was the first midwife to deal with Davis, meeting her on August 25, 2016 at the Waterside Medical Centre, in Gosport.

Mrs Brown said at the time Davis was 'very excited' about the birth of her first child, adding:  'She was pleased to be pregnant. She was very pleased to be meeting me and really eager to take on health-related advice.

'It was an appointment she never thought she would attend. She was looking forward to her pregnancy.'

The court heard how Davis had discussed her problems with depression and drug use, claiming at the time to not have used cannabis since 2014, Mrs Brown said.

Jurors previously heard Davis and Davies both tested positive for cannabis and cocaine on March 21, 2017.

As the pregnancy had continued, Davis showed signs of becoming 'incredibly tired' with Mrs Brown telling the jury it was 'certainly taking its toll' on the first-time mum.

Mrs Brown also said that during the pregnancy, Davis became increasingly anxious about the health of her baby, worried the youngster was not kicking or moving.

Defending Davis, Katy Thorne QC told the court how the 30-year-old was overjoyed to be a mother, something she suspected she could never have been.

She told the jury Davis had polycystic ovary syndrome, a condition that can affect the chance of women becoming pregnant, Ms Thorne said. 

'She described it as a miracle, she never thought she would have had a child,' Ms Thorne told the court.

Davis, formerly of Gosport but who now lives in Milton Road, Waterlooville, and Davies both deny causing or allowing the death of Stanley Davis.

Although the pair share similar names, they are not related. Davies is not the baby’s biological father.

(Proceeding)