Portsmouth murder accused tells trial that she only meant to frighten - and not kill - the victim

Police officers, including a forensic investigator, at the scene of the murder in Toronto Road, Buckland
Police officers, including a forensic investigator, at the scene of the murder in Toronto Road, Buckland
Fareham Borough Council offices

Warnings after two men claiming to be from Fareham Borough Council try to access homes

A WOMAN accused of murdering an acquaintance over a £100 debt admitted she wanted to ‘frighten’ the victim, a court heard.

Victoria Arthur, 44, revealed she was angry after her partner Julie Palmer had been snubbed in her attempts to be paid back money by Nadine Burden.

Victim Nadine Burden

Victim Nadine Burden

The 36-year-old was found dead in a pool of blood at her Toronto Road house in Buckland on January 28 last year.

Medics tried to save Ms Burden but she was pronounced dead at the scene after suffering several stab wounds.

Arthur, of Milton Road, is facing trial for Ms Burden’s murder at Salisbury Crown Court. The defendant denies the charge after saying she acted in self-defence.

Police interviews with Arthur, who uses a wheelchair, were played to the court showing the defendant covering her face while answering questions incoherently. Arthur denied going over to Ms Burden’s address but did concede she popped out and was ‘fuming’ when a shop was shut.

The defendant admitted to knowing Ms Burden through their mutual interest in taking heroin and would normally see her once a week.

But the relationship quickly soured when Burden could not pay Ms Palmer back the money she owed her – resulting in Arthur stepping in.

Despite telling police in interview she never threatened Ms Burden, Arthur subsequently admitted that she did.

‘I may have threatened her life on the phone but it was just words,’ she said.

‘I was going to give [Ms Burden] a slap when I next saw her. I wanted her to be frightened so she would pay the money.’

Police interviews revealed Arthur admitted taking heroin and drinking cider and beer on the day of Ms Burden’s death, as well as washing the clothes she was wearing.

(Proceeding)