Remembrance Day: When did the First World War end? Where was the armistice signed? Who was the last soldier to die? And when is the 100th anniversary? 

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The Great War started over a hundred years ago but remains a huge part of the national consciousness. 

The Royal British Legion’s poppy appeal has already begun – with the poppies marking the lives all soldiers lost in conflict, including the First World War. 

Soldiers in a trench WW1

Soldiers in a trench WW1

But when did the clash of European and World superpowers end? 

Here's all you need to know: 

When did the First World War start?

Contemporaneously described as the war to end all wars, WW1 – also known as The First World War or the Great War – was started on July 28, 1914. 

With Austria-Hungary declaring war on Serbia on that day following the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in Sarajevo the month before. 

Britain declared war on Germany on August 4, 1914 - and soon nations including France, Russia, the Ottoman Empire, Canada, New Zealand and Australia became embroiled in the war. 

READ MORE: Remembrance Sunday Live: Updates from services and events across Portsmouth, Gosport, Havant and Hayling Island on Armistice 100 

When did WW1 end?

The Great War lasted for 4 years, 3 months and 2 weeks in total and was fought across the globe in:

- Europe

- Africa

- the Middle East

- the Pacific Islands

- China

- Indian Ocean

- and off the coast of South and North America

The war was finally brought to an end with the armistice of November 11 – with guns falling silent on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month. 

Which is why we celebrate Remembrance Day on November 11 each year. 

The armistice was signed between the Allies (Britain, France, etc) and Germany in a carriage of Marshal Ferdinand Foch’s private train at 5am on November 11, coming into effect six hours later. 

READ MORE: Remembrance Day 2018: Why do we have two minute silence? Where does it come from? And when should you fall silent on Armistice 100? 

When is the centenary of the end of WW1?

The armistice bring the end to the First World War came into effect on November 11, 1918 – meaning that Rememberance Day this year (2018) is the 100th anniversary. 

Who were the last soldiers to be killed?

The last British soldier to be killed was George Edwin Ellison of the 5th Royal Irish Lancers - who died at around 9.30am on November 11 while scouting outskirts of Mons, Belgium. 

The final soldier from the Commonwealth to die was Canadian -Private George Lawrence Price - who was shot by a sniper while part of a force advancing into the town of Ville-sur-Haine just two minutes before the armistice. 

With the last soldier to die in World War One is recognised to be American troop Henry Gunther who was killed sixty seconds before the armistice while charging German troops.