Duo labelled 'a menace' for fly-tipping in Portsmouth

Waste left by Zachary Cross outside garages on the corner of Walsall Road and Cheslyn Road last March.
Waste left by Zachary Cross outside garages on the corner of Walsall Road and Cheslyn Road last March.
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TWO men have been ordered to pay more than £700 each for fly-tipping in Portsmouth.

Zachary Cross, 40 of Cheslyn Road, Baffins and Wayne Elliott, 42, of Hawthorn Crescent, Cosham were labelled 'a menace' after they were found guilty of littering last March and January respectively.

A pile of junk left at Port Creek, Hilsea by Wayne Elliot.

A pile of junk left at Port Creek, Hilsea by Wayne Elliot.

Cross left black bags full of waste outside garages on the corner of Walsall Road and Cheslyn Road while Elliot dumped a pile of junk at Port Creek in Hilsea.

Portsmouth City Council investigators took the duo to Portsmouth Magistrates Court after both failed to pay fixed penalties of £75 each.

Both then failed to appear before magistrates so were found guilty of littering in their absence.

Councillor Rob New, cabinet member for environment said: 'People who dump their rubbish around the city instead of disposing it properly, like everyone else, are a menace.

'We will bring them to justice wherever we can, so the courts can make an example of them.

'I hope others take notice of these two cases.'

Each was fined £440, ordered to pay court costs of £266 and a £44 victim surcharge.

Fly-tipping has proved to be a major cause of concern for councils across the Portsmouth area.

The News revealed earlier this year that fly-tipping has cost councils more than £430,000 in just one year.

Across the wider Portsmouth area, there were 4,309 incidents of items dumped on highway railways, footpaths and council land.

Nearly 170 vehicle parts and 199 tyres were ditched by fly-tippers with 13 animal carcasses also dumped in public.

Six councils in Portsmouth, Havant, Fareham, Gosport, East Hampshire and Winchester spent £137,214 and £295,903 on enforcement and cleaning up the waste respectively.

Between the six councils, more than 1,100 warning letters were issued to suspected fly-tippers.

Graham Smith, from Solent Environmental Action said at the time: 'It is a crime, a serious environmental crime and it is absolutely terrible.'

Dee Haas, chairwoman of Campaign to Protect Rural England Hampshire also said: 'CPRE Hampshire wants to see an end to fly-tipping. It is an eyesore, an environmental polluter and a hazard to domestic animals and wildlife.'