Children learn importance of staying cyber safe

From left, Emily Miles, 11, Roser Rahman, 13, Finn Brook-Holmes, 11, and Isabella McGowan, 11, take part in the CyberFirst Adventurers event.
From left, Emily Miles, 11, Roser Rahman, 13, Finn Brook-Holmes, 11, and Isabella McGowan, 11, take part in the CyberFirst Adventurers event.
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YOUNGSTERS have been getting cutting-edge training on keeping safe in cyberspace.

More than 40 pupils aged 11 to 14 from schools across the city attended the CyberFirst Adventurers course hosted at the University of Portsmouth.

From left, Catrin Gibbard, 12, Amelia Phillips, 12, and Hannah Brook-Holmes, 13, at work on problem-solving at the CyberFirst Adventurers event

From left, Catrin Gibbard, 12, Amelia Phillips, 12, and Hannah Brook-Holmes, 13, at work on problem-solving at the CyberFirst Adventurers event

Run by Whiteley-based ThinkMarble, the workshops had an emphasis on the use of social network sites and protecting personal information that could potentially leave users vulnerable to cyber attacks.

Year 8 Portsmouth High School pupil Amelia Phillips, 12, attended yesterday.

She said: ‘We have been learning about the use of data and how easily it can be hacked.

‘It is really important because if you don’t protect yourself well enough then people can find out about your details.

From left, Emily Miles, 11, Roser Rahman, 13, Finn Brook-Holmes, 11, and Isabella McGowan, 11, take part in the CyberFirst Adventurers event. Picture: Chris Moorhouse

From left, Emily Miles, 11, Roser Rahman, 13, Finn Brook-Holmes, 11, and Isabella McGowan, 11, take part in the CyberFirst Adventurers event. Picture: Chris Moorhouse

‘I didn’t know much about cyber security before today but I am now considering it as a future career.’

Year 7 Meoncross School pupil Emily Miles, 11, said: ‘I have learnt about the importance of cyber security and potential dangers.

‘You need to be careful about what you put online as you don’t want people to find out about your personal details.’

The event was run in collaboration with the University of Portsmouth who provided use of The Future Technology Centre.

ThinkMarble managing director Andy Miles said: ‘I am passionate about making a difference in society and one of the key issues in modern life is about staying safe and secure online.

‘The children have been using an initiative called the digital detective to learn about their cyber hygiene – being careful about the digital footprint you can leave behind.’

A recent report revealed a workforce shortage of three million cyber professionals  – with 60 per cent of businesses feeling they are vulnerable to a cyber attack.

Mr Miles added: ‘We know there is a skills shortage facing our industry and courses such as CyberFirst Adventurers are innovative ways to engage students into cyber security. It is about getting children interested early on in a potential future career as it is important they make the right choices in their education path.’