Ofsted praises college and rates it as ‘good’

Portsmouth College principal Steve Frampton with students Picture: Portsmouth College
Portsmouth College principal Steve Frampton with students Picture: Portsmouth College

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STUDENTS developing work-related skills, growing in confidence and having support from teachers has seen a college rated Good.

Portsmouth College has retained its rating after an inspection from Ofsted, the education watchdog.

In its report the inspector found the college, in Tangier Road, in Baffins, had ‘grown substantially’ since the 2013 inspection and provided a ‘good-quality education’.

The college’s principal, Steve Frampton said: ‘We are all delighted with this very strong Ofsted report. It reflects the vibrant, successful and aspirational college we now are.

‘I would like to say a huge thank you to staff, governors, students, parents, partners and the community for their continued support to help create a culture of aspiration and innovation.’

The inspection was carried out on March 30 and March 31 and found the college provided good guidance, support and care for students.

In his report, inspector Andy Fitt found:

n Students develop excellent work-related skills through an effective programme of activities which focus on developing enterprise and entrepreneurship skills.

n Students treat each other, and staff, courteously, and interact well with each other.

n Apprentices receive good support from staff, which they value highly.

n The large majority of teachers provide students with a good level of challenge during lessons.

The report added: ‘Leaders and managers have successfully embedded a culture of high expectations for staff and students which has led to improvements in students’ progress and outcomes. Students benefit from attending the college, flourish, and become more confident, articulate and purposeful.’

Portsmouth College was also given some advice and recommendations on how it could improve further.

Mr Fitt said it needed to close progress gaps between students and ensure all students were being challenged in class.

He also suggested that while most students developed work-related skills, there was a minority who needed to be given the same opportunity.

To read the full report visit gov.uk/government/organisations/ofsted