Why spending more time at the beach can help children’s education – by Georgina Mulhall, headteacher of Gomer Junior School in Gosport 

Georgina Mulhall, the headteacher of Gomer Junior School, being presented with the Amazing Educational Establishment of the Year Award at the EBP Souths Amazing People Awards last year'Picture: Sarah Standing (180852-2559)
Georgina Mulhall, the headteacher of Gomer Junior School, being presented with the Amazing Educational Establishment of the Year Award at the EBP Souths Amazing People Awards last year'Picture: Sarah Standing (180852-2559)
0
Have your say

IT IS vital that alongside the National Curriculum subjects, our children receive a broad variety of experiences and opportunities in order to flourish.

Recently the Secretary of State for Education Damian Hinds published the ‘Activity Passport’; inspired by the National Trust’s Book: 50 Things to do Before you are 11 ¾.

This reminds us that children fully benefit from enrichment experiences and many schools have already created similar policy documents.

In order for children to reach their full potential, it is important that such provision reflects our children’s locality.

Despite living at the coast, how many of our children visit the beach regularly?

How many of our children can swim, sail, or windsurf?

How many of our children truly understand the power of the the sea and the changes the beach sees during different seasons?

Our children need skills and experiences alongside the National Curriculum subjects. Our locality is rich with history, engineering industry and natural beauty. Let's embrace the concept of an Activity Passport by travelling a little in our locality to learn, explore and experience.

I can think of no better starting point than the beach.

Beach School activities provide children with the opportunity to learn and develop in their natural environment, encouraging them to explore, create, problem solve and be curious about their environment.

Such skills are transferable to all areas of the curriculum and an important part of childhood development.

Furthermore, holistic learning through Beach Schools should not be underestimated. It feels good to learn outside and it enables children to access a variety of experiences not possible in the classroom - directly or indirectly linked to the curriculum too.

If your child’s school is not a Beach School then why not plan a family trip? You can explore the shore line, look for shells, collect driftwood and beach treasure to make some art. Or use your phone and create a photo story. Maybe help with a beach clean. There is so much to see and do.