Gosport minister issues warning after MPs vote to delay Brexit 

Caroline Dinenage, Gosport MP. Photo: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire
Caroline Dinenage, Gosport MP. Photo: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire

GOSPORT MP Caroline Dinenage believes the vote agreed by MPs tonight to delay Brexit will prove more damaging to the country.

In another day of high drama at the House of Commons prime minister Theresa May finally won a vote –  albeit perhaps a hollow one.

MPs voted to extend article 50 and delay Brexit on March 29. They voted 412 in favour of the motion – with 202 against – resulting in a majority of 210.

The motion passed means Ms May will now ask the EU for an extension until 30 June. If they agree as assumed it means the UK will not be leaving the EU at the end of this month.

The vote came after Ms May's withdrawal agreement was rejected for the second time on Tuesday and MPs voted the following day to rule out a no-deal Brexit.

The potential delay to Brexit will cause further issues for the country, Ms Dinenage has warned though.

The MP told The News she did not back the vote to extend article 50 tonight: ‘I was hopeful that we would deliver on the referendum and move forward with a Brexit deal this week.

‘An extension simply causes more uncertainty for local people, businesses and employers.’

Meanwhile Portsmouth South MP Stephen Morgan said voting to extend Brexit was inevitable following the dire state of affairs.

He said: ‘The only reason the house debated the extension of article 50 is because of the appalling mess the government has made of the Brexit negotiations. With days left until the deadline, an extension is not a choice, but a necessity.

‘Tonight I voted for that extension. I will continue to put party politics to one side and put our city and country first in finding a consensus for the way forward.’

MPs also decisively rejected an amendment to delay Brexit for a second referendum earlier today. The amendment, tabled by Independent Group MP Sarah Wollaston, was defeated by 334 votes to 85, a majority of 249.

Speaking of the move to reject a new public move, Mr Morgan added: ‘We do not think today is the right time to test the will of the house on the case for a new public vote. Instead, this is the time for parliament to declare it wants an extension of article 50 so that, after two-and-a-half years of vexed negotiations, our political leaders can finally decide on what Brexit means.

‘That is because a people’s vote is not just another option in this Brexit crisis – it is a solution to this crisis. When the real costs of Brexit are measured up against the broken promises made for it in 2016, we believe parliament will have better opportunities to decide.

‘It is only fair and reasonable to give the public a real say on this crucial decision for our country.’