Andy’s Army out in force for seafront vigil

MP looks at A&E and out-of-hours care

0
Have your say

more than 400 car enthusiasts joined the family of a young man who died of skin cancer for a candlelit vigil in his memory.

Andy Prowting lost his battle with the disease earlier this month.

Family and car-enthusiast friends of the late Andy Prowting, below, gathered last night at the D-Day Museum car park in Southsea to light candles in his memory. Picture: Malcolm Wells (143603-7899)

Family and car-enthusiast friends of the late Andy Prowting, below, gathered last night at the D-Day Museum car park in Southsea to light candles in his memory. Picture: Malcolm Wells (143603-7899)

The 24-year-old was due to attend a car meet at the D-Day Museum car park last night where the organisers were fundraising to pay for treatment in America for him.

Instead, the money raised will go to the Andy’s Army fund to pay for his funeral and the children and young adults’ cancer ward at Southampton General Hospital.

Jordan Folkard, of Southern Cruisers, was one of the organisers of the event, which saw hundreds of modified car enthusiasts line the car park and put candles on their dashboards in memory of Andy.

He said: ‘I was lucky enough to meet him and I will always remember his incredible smile and how nice he was.

ANDY PROWTING   (PM)           MRW    3/9/2014   ''Andy Prowting (24) from Leigh Park''Andy has a vigorous form of cancer and is hoping to raise sufficient funds to travel to Texax in the USA for a revolutionary form of treatment''Picture: Malcolm Wells (142581-0462) PPP-140309-134542003

ANDY PROWTING (PM) MRW 3/9/2014 ''Andy Prowting (24) from Leigh Park''Andy has a vigorous form of cancer and is hoping to raise sufficient funds to travel to Texax in the USA for a revolutionary form of treatment''Picture: Malcolm Wells (142581-0462) PPP-140309-134542003

‘The fact that someone so young and full of life can die in that way he has shocked everyone. We want to do what we can.’

Andy’s mum Julie Williams, 49, was joined by her family who said they were overwhelmed at the response to Andy’s death.

She said: ‘We are going to keep fundraising for Andy’s Army.

‘It does help in a way to have something to focus on.’

So far around £45,000 has been raised.

As reported, Andy, a security guard of Silkstead Avenue, Leigh Park, first noticed an odd-looking mole on his back in January this year.

He was diagnosed with the severe skin cancer malignant melanoma.

In April, surgeons at Queen Alexandra Hospital removed the lymph nodes under his right arm and tissue in his back.

Andy was referred to Southampton to take part in a chemotherapy clinical trial in August.

But when doctors ran tests, they found the cancer had spread to his bones and liver.