Calls for lunchtime walks to prevent DVT

Marine Derek Tomsett, left, pictured with the captain of HMS Victory Lt Cmdr Charles Addis

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DESK workers and long-haul commuters are being urged to take a walk during their lunch break to avoid developing deep vein thrombosis (DVT).

This month is an awareness month for the life-threatening condition which occurs when blood clots form.

Office workers, and others whose lifestyles involve less physical activity, can help to stave off the risk by using their free time to stay active, even just by going for a walk.

Tracy Moth, DVT lead at St Mary’s Treatment Centre in Portsmouth, said: ‘People assume DVT only affects those who are older, have had surgery or on long-haul flights but this is not the case.

‘Those of us specialising in thrombosis prevention have noticed the increasing risk of e-thrombosis – if your lifestyle involves a lot of time spent in front of computers, you may be at risk.’

DVT occurs when blood clots develop in the leg and travel to the lung artery, which could stop blood flow to the lungs.

Studies show sitting for 90 minutes can reduce the blood flow in the vein behind the knee by half.