Daredevils brave the dizzying heights of the Spinnaker Tower

Lucy Bradshaw during her abseil down the Spinnaker Tower. Picture by Tim Green
Lucy Bradshaw during her abseil down the Spinnaker Tower. Picture by Tim Green

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DARING fundraisers proved their commitment to a charity by abseiling more than 330ft down the Spinnaker Tower.

Batman and Banana Woman were joined by more than 20 others at the challenge in Gunwharf Quays to raise money for Brain Tumour Research.

Banana Woman Emma Harris and Batman Ben Standen on the viewing deck waiting for their turn to abseil.
 Picture: Vernon Nash

Banana Woman Emma Harris and Batman Ben Standen on the viewing deck waiting for their turn to abseil. Picture: Vernon Nash

Brain tumours kill more children and adults under the age of 40 than any other cancer.

And many of those taking part in Saturday’s abseil did it for very personal reasons.

Twenty-eight-year-old teacher Lucy Bradshaw, from Bedhampton, lost her mother Joann Nineham in January – just a month after she was diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme.

Lucy was cheered on by her sister, Katie Walton.

Sarah Carr, left, and Carol Slark after abseiling down the Spinnaker Tower. Picture by Elizabeth Emma Photgraphy

Sarah Carr, left, and Carol Slark after abseiling down the Spinnaker Tower. Picture by Elizabeth Emma Photgraphy

Lucy said: ‘I wasn’t nervous, it was just really good fun.

‘I wanted to give something back to help others. We have been through a horrible time but the support we’ve received has been amazing.’

To sponsor Lucy go to justgiving.com/fundraising/lucy-bradshaw2.

Best friends Carol Slark, from Swanwick, and Sarah Carr, from Chichester, celebrated with champagne after reaching the bottom of the tower.

They zipped down together – more than 10 years after Sarah had a golf ball-sized tumour removed.

The 54-year-old gardener said: ‘It was quite serious.

‘My tumour outgrew its blood supply so I actually had a bleed on the brain by the time they discovered it.

‘It was attached to my skull so part of that was taken away and I’ve been left with a dent. I was mostly unaware of what was happening at the time because I was ill, so it wasn’t scary.

‘But the abseil was really scary – at first. Then Carol and I just chatted and laughed all the way down together.’

To sponsor Carol and Sarah go to justgiving.com/fundraising/Carol-Slark1.

The charity funds research at the flagship Centre of Excellence at the University of Portsmouth where scientists are working hard to find a cure for brain tumours.

Another of those fundraising for the charity was Emma Harris, whose grandmother died of a brain tumour 10 years ago.

Emma, 29, from Gunwharf was dressed as Banana Woman and was joined by her friend Ben Standen, dressed as Batman.

She said: ‘I was a young carer for my grandmother, Pat Farnell. To mark the tenth year since her death I’m raising £2,740 for a plaque in her name on the Wall of Hope at the Centre of Excellence.

‘That will fund a day’s research.’ Sponsor Emma at justgiving.com/fundraising/forpatfarnell.

Tim Green is the community fundraising manager for Brain Tumour Research.

He said: ‘We want to say a huge thank you to all 22 people who took part.

‘The money raised from the abseil will help to fund the work at our four Centres of Excellence, including our flagship centre at the University of Portsmouth.

‘This is where world-leading research into the causes of brain tumours and improving treatments is taking place.’

For information go to braintumourresearch.org.