Plans in place to help failing Portsmouth care homes

Harry Sotnick House
Harry Sotnick House
Geoffrey Joy, 77, from Hilsea, wants to thank the NHS as it turns 70 for giving him treatment for 63 years of its existence. Picture: Sarah Standing (180546-8718)

 ‘I owe them my life more than once’ – Geoffrey’s praise of the NHS as it marks 70 years

0
Have your say

PROJECTS are in place to help improve failing care homes.

Portsmouth Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) has outlined a series of schemes to help the number of city care and residential homes rated as requires improvement or inadequate.

As previously reported in The News, data compiled by older people’s charity Independent Age showed 46.5 per cent of care homes in the city have the bottom two ratings – one of seven areas with a figure higher than 40 per cent.

The ratings are given following inspections by health watchdog the Care Quality Commission.

Similar figures were presented to Portsmouth CCG’s governing board earlier this week.

Speaking at the meeting, Innes Richens, chief of Health and Care Portsmouth, said: ‘This is a significant concern for the CCG.

‘This is not an area where we can make quick improvements as these inspections don’t happen weekly but yearly.

‘It often takes a year, sometimes quicker if there are some concerns, for the Care Quality Commission to come back and re-inspect.

‘The CCG is on a journey with Portsmouth City Council and Solent NHS Trust and we are all working to improve care.’

To help improve the failing homes, some of which include Shearwater Home, Harry Sotnick House and the recently-inspected Hilsea Lodge, the CCG is focusing on scheme to improve quality and experience of care and to support staff in the improvements.

One of the projects includes recruiting 12 independent visitors with a background in health or social care who can bring a fresh insight and independent perspective of the homes based on their expertise and experience.

Another includes the Six Steps scheme which develops the knowledge, skills and confidence in staff to deliver care, specifically end-of-life care.

Mr Richens added: ‘The joint approach is absolutely vital.

‘This new team is about utilising the local intelligence so we can respond to concerns more quickly.’