Portsmouth parents unveil memorial garden in memory of brave tot Alfie Evans

Well-wishers pay tribute to Alfie Evans, on what would have been his second birthday, at the Rainbow Garden they have planted in his memory on Southsea Common              Picture: Chris Moorhouse
Well-wishers pay tribute to Alfie Evans, on what would have been his second birthday, at the Rainbow Garden they have planted in his memory on Southsea Common Picture: Chris Moorhouse
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HEARTBROKEN families have created a memorial garden in tribute to a brave tot who lost his battle for survival.

Parents and children from across Portsmouth sowed seeds and planted flowers at the new Southsea plot in honour of toddler Alfie Evans.

Alfie Evans

Alfie Evans

The youngster had been at the centre of a life-support battle between his parents, health officials and the British justice system for several months.

But he lost his fight for survival at the end of last month and died five days after a court ordered his life-support machine to be switched off.

It was a decision that stunned campaigners in Portsmouth, who had been battling alongside others across the nation to keep the 23-month-old on a ventilator.

Now city activists, from the group known nationally as Alfie’s Army, have created a permanent tribute to the little lad from Liverpool.

Located opposite the Southsea Splash Pool, in Clarence Esplanade, Southsea, the site features pictures of Alfie, balloons, flowers and a banner.

Jade Scott, 28, of North End was among those helping to set up the memorial site yesterday afternoon.

She said: ‘This is to give the people of Portsmouth, that followed Alfie’s story, somewhere to come and plant flowers and remember a little boy that has touched the nation and the world.

‘He is a little boy that will go down in history and we must never forget him.’

The project was supported by Portsmouth City Council, which gave campaigners the permission to set up the small tribute space.

The effort was also given the blessing of Alfie’s family, Jade said.

Daphne Medze, 71, of Portsmouth, was there to pay her respects. The grandmother-of-nine said: ‘I have never lost a child. I wouldn’t even want to imagine how Alfie’s parents must be feeling.

‘This isn’t about a group but about individuals, mums just wanting to come out here saying: “That poor little child”.’

Alfie died on April 28. He had been in a coma for more than a year after a mystery brain illness struck him down.

His parents battled through the courts to keep his life-support on, in a campaign that drew the attention of the world’s media and even the Pope.

However, a court ruled it was not in the tot’s best interest to keep him in a vegetative state.