Quarter of adults in Portsmouth fail to do weekly exercise

A quarter of adults in Portsmouth fail to finish half an hour of exercise a week
A quarter of adults in Portsmouth fail to finish half an hour of exercise a week
0
Have your say

A QUARTER of adults in Portsmouth are doing less than 30 minutes of physical activity a week, a new survey has revealed.

Figures from Public Health England show that in Portsmouth, 25 per cent of adults fail to complete more than half an hour of exercise on a weekly basis.

You don’t have to start expensive fitness regimes or wear sports kits to get the benefits of an active lifestyle, though.

Angela Baker

In Hampshire, the figure is 24 per cent while Southampton is one of the worst in the area at 33 per cent. The national average is 28 per cent.

The data also shows 39 per cent of adults aged 40 to 60 in the south east walk less than 10 minutes continuously each month at a fast pace.

Calls are now being made for people to get moving with the use of Public Health England’s Active 10 app encouraging people to do 10-minute brisk walks.

Angela Baker, deputy director for health and wellbeing for Public Health England South East, said: ‘Starting to introduce exercise into your life when you have not been doing any can feel daunting, especially for those intimidated by gyms full of lycra.

‘You don’t have to start expensive fitness regimes or wear sports kits to get the benefits.

‘Whether walking to work, stepping out at lunchtime or taking the dog for a walk – there are many ways to incorporate a brisk walk into your daily life and we hope this app will help people to do this.’

The free app combines walking intensity and time, rather than just distance or steps. It helps people gradually introduce more activity into their daily routine, with goal setting advice and motivational tips. It has already helped 50,000 adults get more active.

Prof Sir Muir Gray, clinical adviser for the Active 10 app and the One You campaign, said: ‘We all know physical activity is good for your health, but for the first time we’re seeing the effects that easily-achievable changes can make. By walking just 10 continuous minutes at a brisk pace every day, an individual can reduce their risk of early death by 15 per cent.

‘They can also prevent or delay the onset of disability and further reduce their risk of serious health conditions, such as Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, dementia and some cancers.’