Man allowed his fields to be used as illegal dump

The illegal rubbish dump set up by Barry Peach at a farm in Menslands Lane, Hambledon
The illegal rubbish dump set up by Barry Peach at a farm in Menslands Lane, Hambledon
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A MAN has admitted running an illegal waste dump in a picturesque part of the South Downs.

Barry Peach’s Meadows Farm home in Hambledon was put under surveillance by the Environment Agency after they were tipped off tons of rubbish was being dumped and burned there.

Barry Peach

Barry Peach

It was the same site where an emaciated Alsatian was found which led to Peach being banned from keeping animals for life.

Portsmouth Magistrates’ Court heard that over six months, trucks full of electrical items, rubble, household waste and other things were seen leaving rubbish.

Six visits were made to the fields, in Menslands Lane, by environment officers and each time the piles of waste had grown and burning rubbish could be seen.

Peach, 35, admitted dumping waste without a permit, illegally operating a waste facility and allowing waste to be dumped on land without a permit.

There is a black market in waste because getting rid of it is expensive.

Gordon Stark

Graham Snook, 60, of Cyprus Road, Portsmouth, pleaded guilty to two charges of dumping waste without a permit, while Paul Davies, 49, of Waverley Road, Southsea, admitted the same charge.

Prosecutor Gordon Stark, acting for the Environment Agency, said: ‘All three of these gentlemen had waste carrier licences so they were well aware of the licences needed.

‘Mr Davies was seen on numerous occasions and we have evidence of him in his role as a director and employee of Rapid Rubbish Removals depositing waste on Mr Peach’s site.’

Mr Stark said detailed waste transfer notes must be held by every waste operator for two years to show ‘cradle to grave’ movement of waste.

There were no notes for any of the waste going into the site.

He went on, ‘We have to license waste because it comes in many different forms – it could be hazardous.

‘There is a black market in waste because getting rid of it is expensive.’

The surveillance of Meadow Farm, which is owned by Peach’s mother and her partner, began in December 20112 and lasted until June 2013 when the Environment Agency had gathered enough evidence to prosecute.

Mr Stark said Snook and Davies were by no means the only ones using the site.

They were each ordered to do 150 hours of unpaid work and must pay £500 costs.

Peach was given a nine-month prison sentence suspended for a year and must also pay £500 costs.

As well as the lifetime ban Peach was fined £3,000 for starving the dog in 2014.