No-one really knows what lies on the road ahead after Brexit | OPINION

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ANYONE who has driven along the M27 towards Portsmouth recently can’t have failed to notice the overhead signs warning of potential paperwork changes post-Brexit if you’re heading for the international port.

With planners fearing as many as 70 per cent of lorry drivers will arrive at the port heading to the EU without the right papers, the implications are troubling. 

They claim that a tailback of just 13 lorries will eave the M275 shutdown.

There are no doubt people reading this who will dismiss this as ‘yet another’ manifestation of remain-supporters’ so-called Project Fear.

But the reality is none of us know exactly what is going to happen on that first day after we leave the EU.

As Prime Minister Boris Johnson refuses to sign the letter to the EU asking for an extension, in a fit of petulance more befitting a child than a statesman, and MPs squabble over potential amendments, no-one seems to know when or whether they will be having a vote on the deal, meaningful or otherwise.

Yes, we are sure most sane people are heartily sick of it all by now, but changing tactic to saying: ‘Just get it done,' for the sake of getting it done, seems to be in the service of a perverse act of national self-harm.

However, in the meantime, whatever happens, we do need to be prepared. As Hampshire chief fire officer Neil Odin puts it, they are looking at ‘the reasonable worst case for EU exit.’

Brexit is likely to impact on us in ways few of us could have seen when we took part in the 2016 referendum. However, we should at least be planning for those things that we can retain some degree of control over, no matter how frustrating they are for the wider population.

Even if it is going to cause us some short-term, and possibly long-term, problems on the roads.