The golden years when trolley buses and trams ruled Portsmouth’s roads 

PICTURE 1: This trolleybus driver must have thought he was still driving a tram and stooped in the middle of the road. Photo: Barry Cox collection
PICTURE 1: This trolleybus driver must have thought he was still driving a tram and stooped in the middle of the road. Photo: Barry Cox collection

Was the driver of this trolley bus a former tram driver as he has stopped in the middle of the road?

As we know, trams were restricted as to where they could stop. So were trolley buses to a certain extent, but not so much as this driver thinks.

PICTURE 2: Looking west from Lake Road towards Kingston Road circa 1930. Photo: Godfrey Doyle collection.

PICTURE 2: Looking west from Lake Road towards Kingston Road circa 1930. Photo: Godfrey Doyle collection.

As can be seen in Picture 1, he had plenty of trolley space to pull well over at the stop outside St Mary’s Church, Fratton Road.

Looking at the ladies with their best hats on, I would think this is a late 1930s scene.

One at the rear appears to be holding her baby in a white shawl.

I would say this was taken in summer because the conductor is wearing a white-topped cap and the trees are in full leaf. Though it may be a chilly day as the ladies are all wearing coats as well.

PICTURE 3: By the 1970s the Sunshine Holiday Camp on Hayling Islance had become a centre. Any idea who the DJ is?

PICTURE 3: By the 1970s the Sunshine Holiday Camp on Hayling Islance had become a centre. Any idea who the DJ is?

The wall to the left was the wall to the vicarage but later became the home of Barrells Funeral Directors.

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Another superb Portsmouth transport photograph this time from Godfrey Doyle (Picture 2) . It is a high level view along Lake Road towards Kingston Road junction circa 1930.

This could be called a double junction as The Union public house is the last building in Fratton Road while Timothy Whites is the first building in Kingston Road.

PICTURE 4: Southsea model village and miniature people. The look on the little girls face says it all, delighted at the miniature people around the hop kilns. Photo: Barry Cox collection

PICTURE 4: Southsea model village and miniature people. The look on the little girls face says it all, delighted at the miniature people around the hop kilns. Photo: Barry Cox collection

To the immediate left, just out of camera, is the Tramway Arms, now the Indian gate restaurant.

The tram has just turned left from Kingston Road into Lake Road heading for Portsmouth Dockyard.

Notice the destination board is in two words, DOCK YARD.

It’s another summertime scene with driver and conductor wearing white-topped caps.

In the 1960s this junction became defunct when the buildings in Lake Road were demolished and a new junction made much further down into Fratton Road to the right of the location here. 

This part of Lake Road is now a small part of Hanway Road.

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I saw the photograph (Picture 3) in a Sunshine Holiday Centre programme but could not find a date.

I thought it might be the late 1960s but then saw that the DJ in the photograph was holding a Jethro Tull LP,  Aqualung which was released on March 19, 1971.

I then saw, in small lettering, an introduction to the next year’s entertainment which was for 1974. 

So, there we are then. 

Does anyone recognise the DJ?

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Doesn’t the look of enjoyment on the little girl’s face, (Picture 4) , say it all? 

This is a 1960’s view of Southsea Model Village with a hop kiln and associated buildings.

The little model people are a treat as well.

I have not been in the model village since I was a child so cannot tell you if this house is still part of it.