30 Victorian pubs in Portsmouth you can still get a pint in

PORTSMOUTH as we know it was heavily shaped by the Victorian era.

Friday, 26th July 2019, 6:32 pm
Queen Victoria

From the founding of Southsea, to the railway stations and the construction of the Guildhall, the mark of Queen Vic’s reign can be seen across the city. A number of popular Portsmouth pubs date back to the Victorian days, including the following. 

This pub in Queens Road dates back to 1896, towards the end of Queen Vic's reign. It replaced an earlier tavern
This pub can be found in Stamshaw Road, Stamshaw, and it dates from the late Victorian era. After being threatened with closure in the 90s it was saved and refurbished.

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Located in Binsteed Road, Buckland, this is another of the Portsmouth pubs that dates back to the Victorian era. It has kept the same name since opening.
This pub in Cromwell Road, Eastney, dates back to the reign of Queen Vic. The original interior was gutted in the 1980s.
This pub located in Eldon Street, Southsea, dates back to 1899, close to the end of Queen Victoria's reign. It has an attractive bay-front.
Designed by A H Bone, a celebrated pub architect, this pub in Festing Road, Southsea, is dates back to the Victorian era and was once a hotel. It was close to the defunct East Southsea station.
Located in Albert Road, Southsea, this pub dates back to the 19th century. Originally know as the Volunteer Arms, it is one of the best examples of a traditional tavern in the city.
This traditional local can be found in Fawcett Road, Southsea, and dates back to the Victorian times.
This pub can be found in King Street, Southsea, and was known as the Diamond for over a century. It was renamed in 2006.
Located in Lawrence Road in Southsea, this pub has been on the same street corner since the reign of Queen Victoria.
An ornate pub, this tavern has occupied the same spot in Albert Road in Southsea since the Victorian days.
This pub has lived many lives since being founded in the Victorian era. From being turned into a cocktail bar in the 90s. It reclaimed its original name in 2017.
Another one of A H Bone's pubs, it opened in the 1880s and can be found in Twyford Avenue, Stamshaw.
This pub in Jessie Road, Southsea, dates back to the end of Queen Vic's reign and opened in the 1890s.
This Victorian tavern can be found in Newcome Road, Fratton and is popular with Pompey fans.
Another late era Victorian pub, this can be found in Francis Avenue in Southsea. It was refurbished in the 1990s and used to be close to the East Southsea station.
This pub in Pembroke Road, Old Portsmouth, was known as the Blue Posts when it first opened in the Victorian era but changed its name in the 1890s.
Located in Stamshaw Road, Stamshaw, this pub has traded under the same name since being founded in the 19th century.
This pub in Fawcett Road, Southsea, has operated under the same name since the Victorian era.
This pub can be found in Milton Road. It dates back to the 19th century.
This pub in Albert Road, Southsea, dates back to the 1890s at the end of Queen Vic's reign.
Located in Edinburgh Road, Landport, this is another of the Victorian era pubs designed by A H Bone.
Designed by A E Cogswell, one of the most famous Portsmouth pub architects, it opened just before the turn of the 20th Century at the end of Queen Vic's reign.
This pub in Shearer Road, Kingston, was built in the 1890s and underwent a costly refurbishment in 2006.
This pub in Highland Road, Eastney, was named Cambridge Arms when it opened in the 19th century but is now known as Sir Loin of Beef.
Located in New Road, Copnor, this pub was built in the 1890s while Queen Vic was still on the throne. It features a large carving of a stag at roof level.
This pub in Surrey Street, Landport, was called the Victoria Hotel when it opened in the 1890s. It got it's current name in the 1970s.
This pub in London Road, North End, started its life in the 19th century as the North Pole, it was converted into a shop in the 1950s before becoming a pub again in the 80s.
This pub in Highland Road, Eastney, was originally called the Royal Oak when it opened in the late 19th century.
This pub in Winchester Road, Buckland, dates back to the 1880s.