'I'm nearly speechless': Plan for 261 'appalling' homes in Fareham rejected by councillors

The plans from Persimmon Homes for the 261 homes in Stubbington.
The plans from Persimmon Homes for the 261 homes in Stubbington.
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  PLANS for 261 homes slammed for their 'appalling' design have been rejected by councillors.

The application would have seen Persimmon Homes build the new homes on farm land east of Oakcroft Lane in Stubbington.

A mock-up of the designs for the homes proposed by developers Persimmon.

A mock-up of the designs for the homes proposed by developers Persimmon.

The planning committee at Fareham Borough Council received more than 150 letters of objection from residents close to the propose side.

Planning officers told the committee that the plans would be contrary to more than 20 council policies, ranging from concerns about the houses appearance to the developments lack of sustainable travel provisions.

One resident said the plan would represent 'carte blanche capitulation' to developers wanting to build within the strategic gap between Fareham and Stubbington in the future.

Mr John said: ‘The Persimmon proposal could not be more bereft of mitigating considerations.

‘Obviously they plan to build as many densely packed houses on hitherto open fields.’

Councillor Hockley said the 'crampt' two storey and three storey houses reminded her of the song 'Little Boxes' by Malvina Reynolds, which protests suburban sprawl.

She said: ‘I thought it looks awful.’

The plans, which would have included 114 properties as two-bed flats, left Councillor Mandry 'nearly speechless.'

She said: 'It really takes the biscuit.

‘These developers say, 'we know that we do not have a five year housing supply.'

'But that does not give them the opening to cram as many buildings as they can into the countryside.'

The developer had originally proposed to build more than 300 homes within a space smaller than two football pitches.

A spokesman for Persimmon Homes, Dave Buczynskyj, said the development would have contributed more than £2m to infrastructure projects in the borough and £1.3m to the council’s education budget.

The council voted unanimously to reject the plans.