Juniors run to raise cash for poorly infant in Portsmouth

The Fleur de Lys Nelson under 11 football team, with manager Paul Urry, right, coach Darren King and, holding the ball, Noah's brother Harry, 10 
Picture: Ian Hargreaves (160182-2)
The Fleur de Lys Nelson under 11 football team, with manager Paul Urry, right, coach Darren King and, holding the ball, Noah's brother Harry, 10 Picture: Ian Hargreaves (160182-2)

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  • Juniors’ football team runs to raise money for hospital equipment
  • Effort was inspired by Noah Yaxley, who turns blue in water
  • Donations were presented to Queen Alexandra Hospital in Cosham
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YOUNG football players put their endurance to the test to fundraise for poorly infants.

The 11 members of Fleur de Lys Nelson under-11s ran 50 laps of the Roko/PlayFootball football pitches in Copnor after raising £1,541 from sponsors.

From left, Dr Roy Sievers, Noah, his mum Elisabeth, and dad Alex Yaxley Picture: Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust

From left, Dr Roy Sievers, Noah, his mum Elisabeth, and dad Alex Yaxley Picture: Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust

The effort was inspired by 17-month-old Noah Yaxley, from Stamshaw, who has a rare genetic condition which means he turns blue in water.

Noah’s 10-year-old brother, Harrison Essex, plays for the Drayton team.

Team manager Paul Urry said he was proud of the team’s efforts. He said: ‘All the boys had two weeks to find sponsors and they did 50 laps of Roko (about seven miles), running non-stop.

He said: ‘They put in a lot of commitment and it’s a great achievement.’

They put in a lot of commitment and it’s a great achievement

Paul Urry

Proceeds went towards Noah’s family’s fundraising effort, which has raised £4,222 in total.

The money was given to Queen Alexandra Hospital for an optiflow oxygen therapy machine and an ECG scanner.

Noah’s mum, Elisabeth Yaxley, thanked football team and everyone else who had helped the appeal. She said she was delighted to help the hospital that supported her son.

She said: ‘They are brilliant with Noah. He has been on the optiflow machine before and I know that is what they need.

‘I just want to do anything I can, to help give something back.’

Elisabeth discovered Noah’s condition when he was 11 months old and he suddenly turned blue for the first time in the bath.

Medics found it was the result of a chromosome disorder which is thought to affect only about 200 children in the world.

Elisabeth now takes Noah to QA every two weeks for a bath and so his condition can be monitored.

Roy Sievers, consultant paediatrician at QA, said: ‘I am overwhelmed by the achievement of Noah’s family and friends who have raised such a generous donation, which will directly help many of the children who have to visit our department.’