Portsmouth’s The Mary Rose named Britain’s best buried treasure 

The Mary Rose has been named Britain's best buried treasure
The Mary Rose has been named Britain's best buried treasure
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THE Mary Rose has been named Britain’s best buried treasure by a national newspaper. 

She is the most famous Tudor warship and spent centuries buried in the Solent after sinking in a battle against the French in 1545. 

But in 1982 the Mary Rose was successfully raised from the water and she now calls the Historic Dockyard in Portsmouth home, where she is the star of her own museum. 

Buried treasures, such as the preserved Tudor warship, are back on people's minds this week with the discovery of Saxon burial site in Southend-on-Sea in Essex. 

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The princely grave was found near an Aldi and has been dubbed Britain's Tutankhamen, named after the Egyptian Pharaoh who’s nearly intact tomb was discovered in 1922. 

In honour of this new discovery, the Guardian has released a list of Britain's 10 best buried treasure which includes Richard III in Leicester as well as the latest discovery in Essex. 

The Sutton Hoo burial site, which looks like a Hobbit hole from J.R.R Tolkien’s Middle Earth, in Suffolk was also on the list as well as Woodhenge in Wiltshire. 

But while these finds were great, none matched The Mary Rose which has been named the best buried treasure in Britain by the paper.  

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Jonathon Jones, writing in The Guardian, said: ‘For once, the hype comparing British finds to global marvels was justified when Henry VIII’s battleship the Mary Rose was raised from the sea bed off Portsmouth in 1982.

‘This truly is a Tudor Pompeii – a miraculously preserved time capsule of a complete community.

‘Intimate finds include crude sculptures carved by sailors in their spare time, as well as clothing, relics of drinking and eating, and weapons.’