Seagull put down after getting caught in deadly glue trap in Hampshire

The gull had to be put to sleep after being found attached to the trap with glue covering his feathers and legs
The gull had to be put to sleep after being found attached to the trap with glue covering his feathers and legs

AN ANIMAL welfare charity is warning about the dangers of glue traps after a gull died after getting caught in one of the deadly traps.

The RSPCA is encouraging people not to set glue traps, also known as glue boards or sticky traps that are designed to entrap small rodents, because of the dangers they pose to wildlife and even pets.

The gull had to be put to sleep after being found attached to the trap with glue covering his feathers and legs. RSPCA

The gull had to be put to sleep after being found attached to the trap with glue covering his feathers and legs. RSPCA

A gull found in Castle Lane in Southampton on Saturday had to be put to sleep after being found attached to the trap with glue covering his feathers and legs.

RSPCA inspector Charlotte Coggins said: ‘It was really sad to see this young gull desperately struggling in such a shocking state with glue covering his wings and body.

‘If only the person who set the trap could have seen the terrible suffering caused.’

The charity is hoping to raise awareness of the dangers posed by the glue traps and are asking, if the traps are used, that they are only sold to and used by professional pest controllers.  

Llewelyn Lowen, scientific information officer for the RSPCA, said: ‘We’re opposed to the manufacture, sale and use of all glue traps because they cause unacceptable suffering and are totally indiscriminate in what they catch, ensnaring wild animals like birds and even pets.

‘Glue traps may seem like an effective way to catch rodents without killing them, but they come with very serious welfare issues and subject those animals unfortunate enough to get caught to horrific suffering. 

‘In their increasing panic and desperation to escape, rats and mice have been found to tear patches of their fur out, break bones, and even gnaw their own limbs off in a bid to be free.’

Many animals die within the first 24 hours from starvation, dehydration, exhaustion, or even suffocation – caused by the glue blocking their nasal passages.

The RSPCA is running the ‘Wild Animals and Glue Traps’ campaign. As part of this, it is asking that anyone who sees glue traps on sale to the general public to email wildlife@rspca.org.uk with the name and address of the store where the traps are being sold and the date the traps were on sale