Origin of pub names

The little-known origins behind the names of these 22 pubs in the Portsmouth area

PORTSMOUTH is not a city that is short on pubs, with more drinking establishments than you can shake a stick at.

But while the names of plenty of these places are self explanatory, like the Isambard Kingdom Brunel, others can leave you scratching your head. Here are the origins behind 22 of the pubs in the city and surrounding area. 

This Wetherspoons pub in Fratton Road gets its name from John Jacques who was the chief executive of the Portsea Island Mutual Co-Operative Society between 1945 and 1965. The pub is house in a former Co-op building.

5. The John Jacques

This Wetherspoons pub in Fratton Road gets its name from John Jacques who was the chief executive of the Portsea Island Mutual Co-Operative Society between 1945 and 1965. The pub is house in a former Co-op building.
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Located in Fratton Road, it gets its name from the historic district of Froddington which was named in the Doomsday Book. Over the years it was corrupted and became Fratton.

6. The Froddington Arms

Located in Fratton Road, it gets its name from the historic district of Froddington which was named in the Doomsday Book. Over the years it was corrupted and became Fratton.
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The most common name for a pub in the country, there is one in London Road, Cosham. John of Gaunt, found of the House of Lancaster, used it as his symbol. King James I decreed that Red Lions should be displayed in public places.

7. The Red Lion

The most common name for a pub in the country, there is one in London Road, Cosham. John of Gaunt, found of the House of Lancaster, used it as his symbol. King James I decreed that Red Lions should be displayed in public places.
Ian Hargreaves
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Located in Castle Road, this place has one of the more common pub names. With mow meaning a stack or sheaf and barley being the principle grain which beer is made from. So it means Barley Stack.

8. The Barley Mow

Located in Castle Road, this place has one of the more common pub names. With mow meaning a stack or sheaf and barley being the principle grain which beer is made from. So it means Barley Stack.
Malcolm Wells
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