Portsmouth residents recycle more than 22 tonnes of food waste in just two weeks

Portsmouth City Council's cabinet member for environment Councillor Dave Ashmore. Picture: Portsmouth City Council
Portsmouth City Council's cabinet member for environment Councillor Dave Ashmore. Picture: Portsmouth City Council
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MORE than 22 tonnes of food waste was collected in the first two weeks of a new bin trial in the city, it has been revealed.

Around 8,000 Portsmouth households were given two new bins - or caddies - to separate food waste from general rubbish in the kitchen and for collection as part of the pilot, which is set to last six months in total.

Figures show that during that time 20 per cent of food waste that would normally go into the refuse was diverted to food waste recycling in the trial areas.

Councillor Dave Ashmore, environment and climate change boss at Portsmouth City Council, said: 'I am happy to see that so many residents are using the bins for their food waste rather than putting it in their rubbish.

'It is important that we do whatever we can to reduce waste and recycle more and I am keen to see what impact the trial will have over the longer term on reducing waste in the city.'

More items can be put in the caddy than in the average garden compost bin, including all uneaten food and plate scrapings, tea bags and coffee grounds, vegetable peelings, egg shells, bones and cut flowers.  It can't be used for liquids or packaging of any kind.

The food waste is sent to an anaerobic digestion site in Bournemouth, which turns it into fertiliser.

At the end of the trial next year there is scope for food waste caddies to be introduced in households across the city.