Urban development in Fareham is out of control

Don Hodgson, 58 from Lee-on-the-Solent. Don has scooped two awards at the 2018 Chelsea Flower Show for his garden, The Force for Good - a collaborative project between military veterans and Sparsholt College. Picture: Supplied

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Shaun Cunningham from Inform Fareham talks about the massive housing development plans for the Solent corridor

These developments will obliterate much of our open countryside, cause untold and additional traffic congestion and place massive pressures, on our already stretched medical and educational services.

Eastleigh, Fareham, Portsmouth, Gosport and Winchester councils are planning to build 40,000 dwellings, of which over 25,000 will be built on greenfield sites.

Despite being devolved to local councils, the housing requirement figures are likely to increase still further in the coming months.

The figures are set by the Partnership for Urban South Hampshire (Push), an organisation that most people have never heard of.

​Fareham Borough Council has endorsed a local plan including Welborne (a new town the size of Petersfield.

This will add 10,000 homes across the borough. Welborne alone will devour almost 1,000 acres of prime farmland for what purpose?

It has already been established by a planning inspector, that the so-called ‘affordable housing’ at Welborne cannot be ring-fenced for Fareham borough residents.

Also, Winchester City Council has recently approved plans for some 3,500 dwellings north of Whiteley, and plans to add up to 250 dwellings at each of: Denmead, Swanmore, Waltham Chase and Wickham and 500 at Bishops Waltham.

Of this total of 7,500 it is likely that some 7,000 will be built on greenfield sites.

Clearly there are huge infrastructure implications from regional developments on this scale – not least of which is the massive impact on traffic congestion.

Despite the welcome news from Highways England that the M27 (J3 – J11) will be converted to a ‘smart motorway’ and even more importantly, be resurfaced with ‘quiet tarmac’ within the next five years, this will at best, only deal with existing traffic congestion.

Given that much of southern Hampshire is already over-developed, who is taking responsibility in order to safeguard the quality of life for existing residents?

The answer would appear to be no-one, reinforced by the announcement of further 2000 homes here in Fareham.

For more information about Inform Fareham, visit the website at

informfareham.org.uk or see its Facebook page