‘A Beach Boy on the beach in Southsea’ – Victorious day two review and pictures

The crowd watching The Pigeon Detectives. Picture: Vernon Nash (180424-0746)
The crowd watching The Pigeon Detectives. Picture: Vernon Nash (180424-0746)

IT was a performance that had me experience something I hadn’t yet at a festival.

When I looked around me and out into the crowd while The Beach Boys legend Brian Wilson was playing, love and laughter filled the air, and simply nothing else.

The Pigeon Detectives give a terrific performance on the Castle Stage Picture: Vernon Nash (180424-0800)

The Pigeon Detectives give a terrific performance on the Castle Stage Picture: Vernon Nash (180424-0800)

The musical genius had a mainly older crowd dipping in and out of their own memories with every song before headliner Paul Weller.

He might have been sat down behind a mic and a piano, but he had people doing everything from singing at the tops of their voices and jumping up and down, to looking lovingly into each others eyes and mouthing his lyrics.

And in those moments I realised that to his fans in the crowd, The Beach Boys’ songs he and his band were singing, all meant something different to each and every one of them.

God Only Knows went down well with loved-up couples who swayed side-to-side with their arms around each other while it was performed. 

Brian Wilson. Picture: Vernon Nash (180424-1041)

Brian Wilson. Picture: Vernon Nash (180424-1041)

But it was Good Vibrations and Surfin’ USA that brought out the real moves in the festivalgoers and as I moved through the crowd, it was hard to spot anyone who wasn’t singing along.

As the set came to an end a courteous bow from Brian and his band was met with a rapturous applause.

Someone said to me earlier on in the day – “a Beach Boy on the beach in Southsea, can you get any better than that?” It seems, according to the crowd, you cannot.

Best-known as the lead vocalist and guitarist of alternative rock band Supergrass, Gaz Coombes was an afternoon crowd-pleaser.

Gabrielle Aplin plays the Common Stage Picture: Vernon Nash (180424-0373)

Gabrielle Aplin plays the Common Stage Picture: Vernon Nash (180424-0373)

He had people nodding their heads and bobbing along to songs like Wounded Egos, before telling the crowd they had a night to remember ahead of them – and that they did.

Although the acts were electric – with me witnessing all types of dancing from swaying to headbanging – the overall feel at the festival was that of a calm, feel-good one.

People talked about making the most of the weather, knowing that today would be less-pleasing with its rain and strong winds.

Drinks had started to spill among the crowd by the time The Cribs hit the main stage early evening, (well, they probably did before this but not as noticeably). The brothers were hyped up and full of energy, making no mistakes in reaching all ends of the stage. 

Men’s Needs was a sure favourite and even had kids throwing their arms up in the air.

Photographers commented throughout the day that the trio and The Pigeon Detectives, who played on the Castle Stage, were the best to photograph because of their wild moves.

Last but not least came Common Stage headliner Paul Weller. He was the former punk and new wave heroes The Jam and The Style Council frontman.

He held a cool presence on-stage and there was something very smooth and sleek about his performance.

He didn’t interact too much with the crowd but after having released 13 solo albums, with a 14th due next month, (True Meanings) he didn’t need to and the audience didn’t care.

One woman next to me singing along to Sunflower shouted: “I love this man!”.

Fans were happy when Paul played The Style Council’s seventh single Shouting to the Top, showing he wasn’t only going to play his solo singles.

Some stood in the same spot throughout his 90-minute performance, proving he was well worth the wait.

To the third and final day of Victorious, let’s hope you can top Saturday.