Going to the Pompey FA Cup final in their Sunday best – Nostalgia

Pompey fans head to Wembley for the 1929 or 1934 cup final with the girls wearing their best hats and the men with neckwear. Photo: Barry Cox collection.
Pompey fans head to Wembley for the 1929 or 1934 cup final with the girls wearing their best hats and the men with neckwear. Photo: Barry Cox collection.
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As we know, Pompey played three FA Cup finals before the Second World War. In 1929 we played Bolton Wanderers, going down 2-0.

In 1934 we played Manchester City, going down 2-1.

In 1939 victory was obtained to the cost of Wolverhampton Wanderers when we beat them 4-1. 

Owing to the outbreak of the war we kept the cup for the following six years.

In the photograph, above, we see supporters ready to set off to Wembley. My colleague Barry Cox, who loaned the photograph, believes it to be the 1929 final as in 1934 the uncomfortable Southdown charabanc would have been replaced by a more modern enclosed coach.

The girls are in their Sunday best along with dress hats, no doubt with a blue headband. The men are all wearing neckwear of some kind and I would like to think many of the ties and bowties are blue. 

One of my readers, Martin Peakall, recently died at the relatively young age of 56. Although a great Pompey fan he was a greater Manchester United fan due to being born in that great city. 

Martin’s family have asked me to tell any fans of United that Martin had a large collection of programmes, signed photographs and cigarette cards of the club over the years, including the picture, below. 

If anyone is interested in obtaining this material please contact me on the email address above. 

Taken well over 30 years ago, below, we see pupils of St Edmund’s Catholic School, Arundel Street, Landport after morning assembly in 1980.

The young lad circled is Laurie Clark, the son of Lawrence Clark of Hayling Island who owns the photograph. 

To the rear is the headmaster and assistant headmaster along with two padres from local churches.

Can anyone tell us why the children are holding crucifixes?

And does anyone recognise themselves from their schooldays?

Photographs like the one, below, enthral me. I have published dozens of Portsmouth Harbour over the past 10 years but whenever I see one not published before I get a high. It does not compare to the harbour of the 21st century. 

From left we have HMS Victory, which dates the photograph to before 1922 when she was taken into dry dock where she remains today.

In front of Victory we have the bows of two yachts. In the centre a Thames barge in full sail is heading up harbour. To the right of the barge is a light cruiser heading out of the harbour. 

To the forefront are two coal-fired Gosport ferries and to the front of them children in heavy coats. It must be a winter scene.