Honeys' star went on to run Leigh Park fish and chip shop - Nostalgia

The four members of the Hampshire police choir at their awards ceremony. They have totalled 217 years between them. Picture: Jan Brayley/Brian Wareham
The four members of the Hampshire police choir at their awards ceremony. They have totalled 217 years between them. Picture: Jan Brayley/Brian Wareham
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Last week I reported the death of Anita June Lockhart (née Liddell), one of The Honeys, the Portsmouth singing sister trio.

I attended her funeral last week at which it was mentioned that when Anita retired from show business in the late 1960s she and husband Maurice took over a fruit and veg shop in Leigh Park. They later ran a fish and chip shop next door.

With her showbiz background Anita always appeared in the shop as if she was going on stage, beautiful hair and looking glamorous.

The customers loved to talk about her appearances with the likes of Cliff Richard, The Beatles and Adam Faith.

The shop was in the parade of shops on the roundabout junction of Purbrook Way and Middle Park Way and I’m sure many will recognise Anita and her husband.

• On May 24 Hampshire chief constable Olivia Pinkney awarded long service certificates to four members of the former Portsmouth City Police for services to the Hampshire Police Male Voice Choir (formerly the Portsmouth City Police Choir). They are Bryan Scarth, Roger Reynolds, Brian Wareham and Tony Thompson.  

All four have completed more than 50 years’ service – 217 in total – and are still singing today.

Portsmouth City Police Choir had its origins in 1940 when the main police station was in the basement of the Guildhall and officers on air raid stand-by duty passed the time by singing.

From those beginnings a choir was formed which was much in demand throughout the city during and after the war, with morale-boosting concerts and radio broadcasts, often with the Royal Marines Band and solo  stars.  

On amalgamation with Hampshire in 1967 the choir became the Hampshire Police Male Voice Choir. It’s still flourishing and has more than 60 members.

It has raised hundreds of thousands of pounds for charity, including performances at the Royal Albert Hall, Cardiff Arms Park, many cathedrals and all over Europe. 

• My pictures last week of the gates to Victoria Barracks last week prompted Stephen Payne to send me this shot of the entrance when it was decorated for the Queen’s coronation in 1953. Stephen says it comes from Portsmouth – A Portrait in Photographs published in 2013 by Celia and Dean Clark.

• With Portsmouth Harbour behind them and HMS Dolphin across the water, we see two young members of the Nolan family who lived at Point end of Broad Street, Old Portsmouth.

It comes from Mike Nolan, left, who is with his sister Colleen. The picture was taken alongside Bath Square in 1948.