When catching oysters was a major industry for Langstone

Oyster schooners in Langstone Harbour.  Picture:Ralph Cousins's postcard collection
Oyster schooners in Langstone Harbour. Picture:Ralph Cousins's postcard collection
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There are many old photographs of Langstone, taken with the habour in the foreground at all times of the day and showing the two pubs and the old mill. Few have vessels in the shot, but here we see what looks like to me like oyster schooners.

Oyster fishing was an important trade for Langstone and Emsworth until some important guests contracted food poisoning and the trade never recovered.

Lord mayor Sir Denis Daly signs his name in concrete at the opening of the Municipal Restaurant July 17, 1941. Picture: Pat Daly collection.

Lord mayor Sir Denis Daly signs his name in concrete at the opening of the Municipal Restaurant July 17, 1941. Picture: Pat Daly collection.

Several clinker-built boats are moored at the harbour’s edge which perhaps could all have been built locally. 

It’s very much an unchanging scene with little in the background having altered during the past century or so.

• On July 8, 1941, Denis Daly, the lord mayor of Portsmouth, was knighted for services to the community.

A charismatic figure within the city, the knighthood was well deserved.

Cosham Wednesday who were active in the 1920s.

Cosham Wednesday who were active in the 1920s.

Just a week later Sir Denis was in Victoria Park for the opening of the Municipal Restaurant and he signed his name on the concrete doorstep.

On one side of the inscription he made an imprint of his right hand and on the other his left foot, rather like in Hollywood Boulevard, California, where film stars left their imprints.

The restaurant was extended in the latter part of January 1942 to provide extra seating for 150 people and it became one of the busiest in the country and served more than over 1,000 meals per day.

I wonder what happened to the concrete step and if it still survives somewhere?

Bobby Moffat.

Bobby Moffat.

• Regular contributor Mick Cooper is more known for his knowledge of 1960s’ pop music locally then football teams. His record collection has to be seen to be believed.

Mick contacted me because he has received from New Zealand a photograph of a football team.

No name was included but it appears the sender’s great grandfather played in a local football team, Cosham Wednesday. His grandfather was also a local victualler so it is possible it was a pub team.

The photograph dates from the 1920s so I doubt if we can help, but you never know...

•  Over the past few weeks I have been publishing photographs provided by Bobby Moffa, the former Pompey schoolboy and reserve team player. He is back in the city on a visit from his home in Dallas until the end of October. 

Last week I met him for a chat about football in America and how it is now popular, although not as much as American football. Here we see Bobby today. If you would like to meet him drop him an e-mail at bobbymoffat14@gmail.com. He would love to meet old pals.