Glory for McKinson as big-time boxing returns to city

Mikey McKinson, left, in action against Colin Lynes. Picture: Neil Marshall (1713340-3)
Mikey McKinson, left, in action against Colin Lynes. Picture: Neil Marshall (1713340-3)
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Heart of Portsmouth's Ivy-Jane Smith collects her silver medal at the AIBA World Youth Championships in India. Picture: England Boxing

Silver lining for Heart of Portsmouth ace on world stage

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One punch. One sickening, rib-fracturing blow.

That was all it took to crown Mikey McKinson’s big night against one of the most venerable domestic names of the past 15 years.

It also sent out a message to the rest of the domestic welterweight division that Pompey’s Problem is a riddle that’s going to take some solving.

The moniker may have been snaffled away from one of the sport’s stellar names in Adrien Broner – but McKinson showed a lifetime spent watching and learning the secrets of this unforgiving business now has him ready to be let off the leash.

Colin Lynes is a two-time British and European champion with a CV and showreel which places him as a standout name to anyone with even a fleeting interest of the noble art.

At 39, the suspicion was he’d be long past his prime and cannon fodder for someone 16 years his junior.

Mikey McKinson lands a punishing body blow against Colin Lynes. Picture: Neil Marshall (1713340-2)

Mikey McKinson lands a punishing body blow against Colin Lynes. Picture: Neil Marshall (1713340-2)

Anyone who saw the Londoner tip the scales 24 hours before McKinson’s coming-out party at the Mountbatten Centre would have told you that was most definitely not the case.

Lynes’ unbelievable physical condition informed those present this was not a man coming for one final pay-day and night under the lights.

And when the bell sounded that notion was confirmed.

What unravelled, in all honesty, was a largely unattractive, disjointed and not-particularly appealing affair for the most part.

I believe I belong on the big stage. I want to get on a fight on TV then the world’s mine. I’m taking over!

Mikey McKinson

Seven months ago, McKinson was involved in a frenetic, crowd-pleasing sojourn into enemy territory to inflict a first professional disappointment upon Swindon’s fancied Ryan Martin.

Lynes was never going to let the 13-0 lad get away with such audacity. What unfolded denied the action-thirsty crowd of the blood and guts most punters crave. Styles makes fights and these two didn’t gel.

A cagey affair saw both men setting traps for their rival to fall into. Feints, counter-punches and triggering shots were the order of the day rather than all-out war.

If that meant the veteran and the young pretender cancelled each other out, it was McKinson who edged the majority of the rounds.

Mikey McKinson is all smiles after his victory. Picture: Neil Marshall (1713340-6)

Mikey McKinson is all smiles after his victory. Picture: Neil Marshall (1713340-6)

It all changed, however, in dramatic fashion with nine seconds remaining of the sixth.

Seizing on a rare opening, McKinson escaped from Lynes’ clutches long enough to sink a left into the Londoner’s rib cage which took everything away from him.

He never looked like beating referee Jeff Hines’ count to spark wild scenes of celebration.

‘I felt I was in control and pinching the rounds in a scrappy fight,’ McKinson said, as he bathed in the afterglow of career-high win.

‘He was using his experience to try to mess things up with me. I was patient, kept things under control and felt I was nicking the rounds.

‘Respect to Colin, I grew up watching him fight but people underestimate my power.

‘I’m not any ordinary fighter but we are real men here and we wanted to fight a real man, a real champion.’

After two victories this year which will see him marked as a dangerman domestically, McKinson is looking to continue his march towards meaningful titles in 2018.

For what it’s worth, he added the WBC international silver belt to his WBC world youth title collected earlier this year.

It’s the traditional honours, security and chance to showcase his talent to a wider audience he really craves, though.

McKinson added: ‘I’ve proved not only to Portsmouth but the welterweight division I’m a threat. In 2018 I want some big fights and to earn my family some money.

‘I believe I made a statement. I believe I belong on the big stage. I want to get on a fight on TV then the world’s mine. I’m taking over!’