Kenny Jackett on his Portsmouth fan flak and how he plans to change opinions

Share this article
0
Have your say

Kenny Jackett confessed the Pompey fan flak he’s faced has had an impact on him.

But the Blues boss acknowledged the best way to change supporter opinion is to deliver victories on the pitch – a route he’s determined to go down.

Pompey’s stuttering start to the League One campaign continued as they suffered a last-gasp 1-0 defeat at AFC Wimbledon on Saturday.

Terell Thomas’ stoppage-time header ensured the Dons took all three points, increasing the pressure on the under-fire Blues boss.

The loss – Pompey’s fourth in the league this term – once again prompted chants of ‘We want Jackett out’ from sections of the travelling support at Kingsmeadow.

Similar cries were heard after the defeat to Wycombe at Adams Park – as well as during the first half of the home win against Bolton earlier this month.

Pompey boss Kenny Jackett, centre, in the visitors' dugout at Kingsmeadow   Picture: Joe Pepler

Pompey boss Kenny Jackett, centre, in the visitors' dugout at Kingsmeadow Picture: Joe Pepler

A run of just three wins from 11 league matches this season, plus a current placing of 18th in the table, has left the Fratton faithful angered.

Jackett admitted he is well aware of the criticism directed at him in recent weeks.

But the Blues boss accepts it’s part of the ‘privileged position’ of being at football manager at a club the size of Pompey.

‘You hear it, definitely,’ said Jackett.

‘Of course it has an impact on you. 

‘But you do realise you’re in a privileged position, being manager of Portsmouth is a privileged position.

‘I certainly understand how management is.

‘I’ve been in football since I left school.

‘You want to be successful and you want to win, that’s where you are.

‘The only thing that’s in your control as a manager is trying to win the next game and beating Lincoln.

‘If you can do that, that’s your way of either coping and turning it around.’

Jackett revealed he’s faced similar criticism during his managerial career.

And the 57-year-old understands the only way to prove his doubters wrong is to make sure the successful periods outweigh the bad times.

He added: ‘There have been bits and pieces (in the past), with some more successful periods than others.

‘There have been times where you’ve been going for promotion or others where it hasn’t quite gone right and you’ve got a series of losses.

‘There have been both.

‘If you want to stay in it you have to have more successful periods than bad times.’