Kate Nash, Wedgewood Rooms, Southsea, REVIEW: 'She may have been made in the noughties but Nash is most definitely a musician for today'

Kate Nash at Wedgewood Rooms, Southsea. Picture: Martin Cox.
Kate Nash at Wedgewood Rooms, Southsea. Picture: Martin Cox.
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Travel back to 2008 and Kate Nash was one of the biggest new names on the UK music scene with a best-selling album and Brit award to boot after making it big on Myspace.

But what everyone really remembers is the signature red fringe, attitude-filled lyrics and simple yet catchy piano riffs.

And despite listening to and enjoying the Harrow singer-songwriter’s more recent but less commercial offerings, it wasn’t until seeing Nash live at the Wedgewood Rooms in Southsea, that she becomes more than just a nostalgia trip for me.

Opening for her final UK tour date were south Londoners Gaygirl, an indie grunge-pop four-piece who set the tone for Nash’s exuberant yet punky set.

Nash captivates as soon as she hits the stage complete with green hair and an extravagant pink netted dress, which becomes a part of the performance whenever Nash isn’t holding a guitar.

The set begins with Play, which served as a kind of prelude for her first album Made of Bricks.

Songs from that record are scattered throughout the show and are met with adoration – notably Foundations has everyone waving their fingertips at the ceiling and wisely-chosen closing number Birds has the crowd reciting back every last lyric.

Although many of the older songs are played Nash does not once sit behind a piano and each track feels fresh as a result.

But it’s with the songs from her last two albums that Nash and her almost-all-girl-band (there is one token male guitarist) really shine.

The audience revels in tracks Life in Pink and My Little Alien (dedicated to her dog) taken from her most recent, entirely crowd-funded, album Yesterday Was Forever.

Nash makes the most of the intimate venue and engages with the audience throughout the gig encouraging singing and shout-outs and finally to advocate talking about mental health issues.

She may have been made in the noughties but Nash is most definitely a musician for today.