Hayling College children learn about the dangers of getting ‘Smashed’

Watch more of our videos on Shots! 
and live on Freeview channel 276
Visit Shots! now
CHILDREN on Hayling Island have been learning about the dangers of underage drinking thanks to actors from a national theatre group.

Hayling College pupils were transfixed as they watched the drama production, Smashed, which charted the experiences of three teenagers, Michelle, Scott and Lee, as they dealt with the difficulties of adolescence and the pressure to become involved in underage drinking.

After covering issues to such as peer pressure and exam stress the story culminates with a fight which results in Michelle being injured and the boys facing the prospect of being placed in a detention centre.

Hide Ad
Hide Ad

Year 8 pupil, Millie Tims, 12, said: ‘Young people do come under pressure to drink and the play really helped draw attention to the potential dangers such as health problems and making poor decisions which can affect the rest of your life.’

Actors, Teague Davis, Rob King and Annie Osborne.

Picture: Habibur RahmaActors, Teague Davis, Rob King and Annie Osborne.

Picture: Habibur Rahma
Actors, Teague Davis, Rob King and Annie Osborne. Picture: Habibur Rahma | JPIMedia

Classmate, Albert Bancroft, 13, added: ‘I really enjoyed the production. A lot of people can be blind to the dangers but this really showed the risks.’

Read More
Chef of the Year cites lack of funding and concentration of fast food joints as ...

The college enlisted the support of the Collingwood Learning Theatre Group to help hit home the dangers of underage drinking after identifying it as a potential problem with youngsters on the island. Following the play the children took part in a number of discussion activities as well as reenacting certain scenes to look at how the characters could have made different decisions.

Assistant headteacher and pastoral lead, Helen Cox, said: ‘Eight years ago there were places on the island where older people didn’t visit due to anti-social behaviour associated with underage drinking. We are now part of the Community Alcohol Partnership to help stop young people abusing alcohol.

Hide Ad
Hide Ad
Albert Bancroft, 13, Harvey Davis, 13, Millie Tims, 12, and Tilly Warner, 13, said the play would help them to make more sensible future choices.

Picture: Habibur RahmaAlbert Bancroft, 13, Harvey Davis, 13, Millie Tims, 12, and Tilly Warner, 13, said the play would help them to make more sensible future choices.

Picture: Habibur Rahma
Albert Bancroft, 13, Harvey Davis, 13, Millie Tims, 12, and Tilly Warner, 13, said the play would help them to make more sensible future choices. Picture: Habibur Rahma | JPIMedia

‘Today’s play was all part of the process of engaging children and getting them on board.’

The initiative certainly appeared to have had the desired affect on students.

Tilly Warner, 13, said: ‘It was much better to watch the performance rather than just learn about the topic in lessons. It was much more visual and shows actually what can happen.’

Millie added: ‘The play makes things much more interactive – it makes it feel like it’s directed at you. The consequences are there in front of you rather than just on a page. It will certainly make me think more carefully about the choices I make.’

Hide Ad
Hide Ad
The play, 'Smashed', helps to educate children on the dangers of underage drinking.

Picture: Habibur RahmaThe play, 'Smashed', helps to educate children on the dangers of underage drinking.

Picture: Habibur Rahma
The play, 'Smashed', helps to educate children on the dangers of underage drinking. Picture: Habibur Rahma | JPIMedia

The performance was part of a nationwide tour covering 90 schools and reaching 14,500 pupils. The play, which is sponsored by the multinational beverage company Diageo, has also been performed at St Edmund’s Catholic School and Springfield School.

Actor, Annie Osborne, who played Michelle, said: ‘The aim of Smashed is to provide a hard hitting message which will hopefully change teenagers attitudes towards underage alcohol misuse. It’s to let children know that they are in control of their own actions.’

Related topics:

Comment Guidelines

National World encourages reader discussion on our stories. User feedback, insights and back-and-forth exchanges add a rich layer of context to reporting. Please review our Community Guidelines before commenting.