From carts to cars –how Isambard Kingdom Brunel watches Portsea change

Today we have a look back at how St George’s Square, in Portsea, has changed.

Tuesday, 16th June 2020, 9:43 am
Updated Tuesday, 16th June 2020, 1:23 pm
St George’s Square, Portsea, Portsmouth, February 28, 1961. Picture: The late Eddie Wallace.
St George’s Square, Portsea, Portsmouth, February 28, 1961. Picture: The late Eddie Wallace.

The church from which the square takes its name is on the right of the old photo above, taken in February 1961.

Old maps show it in the square rather than to one side.

In the war a deep-dug air raid shelter was behind the church.

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NOW: St George’s Square, Portsea, today. Millgate House is in the background and the memorial to Isambard Kingdom Brunel is on the left. He was born in nearby Britain Street. Picture: Bob Hind

It took a direct hit on August 12, 1940.

Three-year-old Eileen Barron, of 9, Brunel Flats, Britain Street, was the only fatality.

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How many boathouses were there at Leigh Park Gardens?

Some 30 years ago houses were built on the site thus making St George’s Square as we see it today but only a third of its original size.

In the recent photo Millgate House is in the background and the memorial to Isambard Kingdom Brunel is on the left.

He was born in nearby Britain Street.

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