NOSTALGIA: Snapshot of life in Edwardian Portsmouth

THEN: Full of life and shops galore ' the eastern end of Highland Road in Edwardian days with Kassassin Street on the right.  'Picture: Barry Cox Collection
THEN: Full of life and shops galore ' the eastern end of Highland Road in Edwardian days with Kassassin Street on the right. 'Picture: Barry Cox Collection
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This marvellous view shows the eastern end of Highland Road, Eastney, at its junction with Kassassin Street, the cobbles of which you can see on the right.

It is a reverse view of the photograph published here on Monday.

NOW: The same view. How boring compared to those Edwardian days.

NOW: The same view. How boring compared to those Edwardian days.

It was taken in the early years of the last century when people could cross the road without fear of being knocked over, except by a tram of course.

In the centre can be seen what looks like a Royal Marine from the barracks in nearby Cromwell Road. He is in the mid-distance, on the right just approaching the two women in white.

In the distance again is Henderson Road with the Barrack Cellars pub appearing over the top of the tram.

In the foreground the double tramlines have just left an interlaced part of the system which was peculiar to Portsmouth’s narrow streets.

A letter from1943 to my late grandmother. Can anyone tell me from where in Egypt it was sent?

A letter from1943 to my late grandmother. Can anyone tell me from where in Egypt it was sent?

And so to my ‘today’ picture showing exactly the same view.

Of course, the trams have long gone as have the shops, all now converted to houses.

The Barrack Cellars was demolished for road-widening purposes and the barracks have also gone.

I mentioned how safe it was to cross the road in Edwardian days, believe it or not I took this modern shot at 12.30pm and there was very little traffic about which is unusual.

When I am standing in streets taking the modern photographs I am usually tooted and shouted at: ‘Get out of the way Bobby Boy, you wanna die?’

•Can anyone help me with the final picture – a letter handed to me recently by a relative.

It was sent to my late grandmother Ruth Sutton from her half-brother Robert in 1943.

The family were bombed out of a house in Diamond Street and then again from Duncan Road. They ended at 3, Wisborough Road, Southsea, but later moved along to number 11.

I have no idea who Robert was although I am told I am named after him. My mother, Robert’s step-niece, never mentioned him.

The letter was written on a special form called a Military Airgraph authorised by the Egyptian Postal Administration.

If any of you military fans can enlighten me about the term: 149 L/A.A. BTY., R.A. M.E.F. I would grateful.

And what happened to Robert I wonder?