Gosport baby death trial: sister says accused mum ‘adored’ her child

Roxanne Davis, who is charged with causing or allowing the death of her son Stanley Davis
Roxanne Davis, who is charged with causing or allowing the death of her son Stanley Davis

THE sister of a woman accused of killing her baby son told a court that the mum ‘adored’ the infant.

Winchester Crown Court heard evidence from Roxanne Davis’ sister Hayley Davis, 26, over the death of baby Stanley.

Stanley Davis Picture: Hampshire Police/PA Wire

Stanley Davis Picture: Hampshire Police/PA Wire

Ms Davis insisted she had ‘no concerns’ over the infant’s wellbeing.

Stanley died of a skull fracture and brain haemorrhage aged just 24 days on March 28.

He also suffered 32 fractures to his ribs and nine fractures to his arms and legs sustained during three separate occasions.

Davis, 30, of Lee Road, Gosport, and her former partner Samuel Davies, 24, of Mayfield Road, Southampton are on trial accused of causing or allowing the death of the infant.

Davis’ sister, Hayley, though, said she had no cause for concern. ‘Roxanne was very loving, gentle and kind,’ she told the court.

She added: ‘Stanley was her world.’

Asked about how Davies was, she said: ‘He was very hands-on and took on the role of dad like changing nappies and other things.’

Speaking of Stanley, Ms Davis said: ‘He was very timid and slept a lot. He rarely cried.’

Ms Davis did admit seeing her sister and Davies argue at times but said it was nothing out of the ordinary. ‘I heard them bickering sometimes but it was about minor things like putting washing away. They would be laughing again after about five minutes,’ she said.

Ms Davis admitted her sister could be ‘up and down’ and could be ‘emotional’ but as a mum herself she explained that was normal.

The witness told the court that social services were contacted by a health visitor raising concerns after a ‘birth-like mark’ was spotted behind his ear which could not be accounted for. ‘Roxanne was very concerned and had never seen it before,’ Ms Davis said. ‘Sam said he had never seen it before.’

After a visit to the hospital, though, Stanley was given the all-clear with it just a birthmark, Ms Davis said. ‘We left hospital crying with joy,’ she added.

Ms Davis admitted thinking Stanley ‘looked poorly’ on another occasion but did not think it was anything out of the ordinary.

(Proceeding)