Hayling Island attempted murder trial: Stabbing victim says ‘I thought I would die’

Lee Scattergood
Lee Scattergood
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A KNIFING victim who miraculously survived a frenzied attack from his best friend after winning a £20 bet over a game of pool has revealed he thought he was about to die, a court heard.

Lee Scattergood, of Havant, remembers blood pouring from his stomach after being dealt up to four vicious blows to his abdomen and chest by lifelong friend Jay Shepherd, 48, after a row exploded at The West Town Inn in Hayling Island last November.

The ordeal left Mr Scattergood, 48, in an induced coma for three weeks after having most of his lower bowel removed.

Shepherd, who was best friends with the victim since they were 12 years of age, is on trial at Portsmouth Crown Court for attempted murder and carrying a bladed article.

Prosecutor Thomas Wilkins told jurors events flared up after the game of pool. ‘The defendant pots the black but the white goes in at the same time so he loses the match,’ he said.

Video played to the court showed Shepherd punching Mr Scattergood, resulting in the pair brawling on the floor.

‘There was a fight with Jay in the pub after I won a £20 bet over a game of pool I won. I still haven’t been paid,’ Mr Scattergood told the court.

Shepherd was ejected from the pub before returning to his caravan at Parkdean Holiday Park. The pair arranged to meet later after exchanging a flurry of messages.

Mr Scattergood continued: ‘I remember getting a phone call from Jay saying he was going to kill my mum.

‘The next thing I remember is seeing Jay outside the pub and he comes towards me. I’m thinking we’re going to have a fight. He then said “have it” and next thing I know I have blood pouring out of me. 

‘I knew I’d been stabbed and thought I was probably going to die and wouldn’t see my family, especially as I have a blood clotting condition where it is harder to stop blood coming out.’

The court heard from Dr Basil Purdue, who told jurors Mr Scattergood was ‘extremely fortunate’ to have survived the attack after an artery was wounded resulting in eight litres of blood being lost in total – including after transfusions.

‘It is clear to me that Mr Scattergood only survived because of the promptness and efficiency of his treatment,’ Dr Purdue said.

Complications over the massive loss of blood had left doctors with no choice but to remove ‘most of the bowel’ which was likely to ‘exert a significant influence on the rest of Mr Scattergood’s life’, Mr Purdue added.

Shepherd claims he acted in self-defence after being ‘pummelled on the floor’, according to his barrister Elisabeth Bussey-Jones.

(Proceeding)