Paramedic tells inquest that he was afraid of Gosport man who ran at him swearing

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A PARAMEDIC who attended the house of a man paranoid from taking cocaine told an inquest he ‘felt threatened’ and was in fear of his life.

The third day of hearings into the death of Matthew Lynn heard how crews from South Central Ambulance Service (Scas) were called to Lees Lane, in Gosport, on February 7, 2017.

His housemate had called 999 concerned about Mr Lynn who was pacing the house, thinking someone was after him.

But paramedic Samuel Folland told Portsmouth Coroner’s Court when he arrived, he felt threatened. He said: ‘I went up to the door and two men answered. One of them said “watch out mate, he (Mr Lynn) is getting very aggressive”.

‘Matthew Lynn then burst through the door, he was swearing and ran at me.

‘I ran to my car in fear and locked it. I thought he would hurt me.’

The inquest heard a second ambulance crew turned up with two paramedics but Mr Folland told them to stay in the vehicle ‘because Mr Lynn could hurt them’.

The ambulance was parked facing away from the house so the crew did not see Mr Lynn run from the house.

During the inquest, his brother Richard questioned the paramedics staying locked in the ambulance rather than assessing and treating Mr Lynn.

Mr Folland said: ‘I was quite frightening. I am not going to stand there and fight anyone or try to restrain him.’

Jurors heard from Guy Alexander, an investigations manager for Scas, who gave evidence about the policy when attending potentially-violent calls.

He said: ‘Staff must always assess the situation for violence and then withdraw.

‘We don’t want to risk the people who have come to help the patients being injured. It is important staff stay safe.’

Mr Alexander said it was up to the paramedics’ judgement if a situation is possibly violent and they should withdraw.

Previously, jurors were told Mr Lynn, 27, ran to McColls, on Forton Road, where he threw bottles, shouting people were after him. He ran through a perspex door leading to the tills after which two men restrained him. Police arrived and body-worn footage shows Mr Lynn handcuffed and restrained by officers.

The hearing was told when Scas turned up to the store, they were able to observe Mr Lynn from a distance while he was being restrained and they could see he was breathing and conscious.

Originally, it had been decided to take him to Queen Alexandra Hospital in a police van but as his condition worsened, he was taken in an ambulance with a police officer. At QA he was put into an induced coma but suffered major organ failure and his life support machine was switched off on February 17.

(Proceeding)