Portsmouth’s Mary Rose Museum reveals never-before-seen parts of doomed Tudor warship

Doomed Tudor warship The Mary Rose, which is at The Mary Rose Museum in Portsmouth.
Doomed Tudor warship The Mary Rose, which is at The Mary Rose Museum in Portsmouth.
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KEY parts of the doomed Tudor warship the Mary Rose are going on display for the first time at a museum honouring the historic vessel.

The Mary Rose Museum, in Portsmouth Historic Dockyard, is revealing new portions of the ship following a lengthy conservation process.

Mary Rose museum at the Portsmouth Historic Dockyard.  Picture: Chris Moorhouse

Mary Rose museum at the Portsmouth Historic Dockyard. Picture: Chris Moorhouse

Finally being unveiled include the vessel’s stem, a crucial structural piece of timber that curves upwards from the keel to define its bow.

It had eluded underwater archaeologists until 2003. Having undergone excavation and conservation since then, the rediscovered stem can now finally be seen in the Weston Ship Hall, at the heart of the Mary Rose experience.

Also unveiled are the never-before-seen ship’s pump and another of her huge anchors.

The display of the artefacts coincides with the 40th anniversary of the Mary Rose Trust.

The Mary Rose Museum

The Mary Rose Museum

Formed in 1979, the trust works tirelessly to conserve and display the remains of the Mary Rose and her objects.

The Mary Rose had been the pride of Henry VIII before she sank fighting a French invasion fleet during the Battle of the Solent in 1545.

Dr Alexzandra Hildred, head of research and curator of ordnance and human remains, joined the project in 1979 and has been part of the Mary Rose story ever since.

Alexzandra said: ‘It is difficult to perceive that 40 years has passed since the formation of the Trust, it has gone in the blink of an eye.’

Alexzandra added reuniting the newly conserved stem with the Mary Rose was ‘an apt way’ to mark the anniversary.

The Mary Rose Museum is offering 30 per cent off tickets bought online from tomorrow until Sunday, February 24.

For details, see maryrose.org