Door staff at Yates in Portsmouth bar Jasmine for being ‘on drugs’ – when in fact she has cerebral palsy

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A WOMAN is demanding change after bouncers accused her of being on drugs – when she actually has cerebral palsy.

Jasmine Jackson, 25 from Purbrook, went for a night out with a group of friends in Portsmouth last Saturday.

Jasmine Jackson, a 25-year-old with cerebral palsy, is fuming after a bouncer at Yates in Portsmouth stopped her from coming in on Saturday night, mistaking her disability for her being 'on drugs' Picture: Habibur Rahman

Jasmine Jackson, a 25-year-old with cerebral palsy, is fuming after a bouncer at Yates in Portsmouth stopped her from coming in on Saturday night, mistaking her disability for her being 'on drugs' Picture: Habibur Rahman

But when they queued up to get into Yates in Guildhall Walk, Jasmine was accused of being on drugs by a bouncer, and was refused entry.

Now, Jasmine is not only fighting for justice, but for more awareness of disabilities.

Jasmine said: ‘I didn’t even get the chance to show my ID - the bouncer just pointed to me and said I wasn’t coming in because I was on drugs.

‘I went closer to him and said I had cerebral palsy but he just didn’t want to listen to me.

Jasmine Jackson with her mother, Jodie Norris Picture: Habibur Rahman

Jasmine Jackson with her mother, Jodie Norris Picture: Habibur Rahman

‘It wasn’t right at all and this isn’t the first time it’s happened.’

Jasmine was diagnosed with cerebral palsy when she was just six months old, and was kicked out of another venue in Guildhall Walk in the past six months for ‘looking drunk’ – despite not being a heavy drinker. This 

She says that it’s important for people to recognise those who have a disability so that they aren’t discriminated against.

She said: ‘They need to be more aware of disabilities because it felt like I was being singled out.

‘I just don’t understand how they can’t tell the difference between somebody with cerebral palsy and someone on drugs.

‘I don’t want anybody else to be put in the same position by other bouncers.’

A Yates spokeswoman said: ‘Whilst there was initial confusion regarding Ms Jackson’s condition, our security team apologised personally on the evening, inviting Jasmine and two other guests to bypass the queue and enter the bar.

‘Our management team has also followed up with the family since and will be handling this complaint as her experience does not reflect company policy.’

While Yates claimed in the statement to The News that Jasmine went into the bar, she says this is not true – and  says that she will never return to the venue after how she was treated.

She said: 'What they said is set in stone – they’ve have apologised but you can’t just take something like that back.

‘I didn’t go in – I don’t go in there often in the first place and I would certainly wouldn’t go in now.’

Jim Morey, secretary of the Gosport Access Group and Disability Forum, says that this sort of treatment is ‘unacceptable’.

He said: 'Thankfully these sort of incidents happen a lot less than they used to.

'But the fact it still happened is unacceptable. It shouldn't be happening in this day and age. It is sad that something like this has occurred and I think it is down to the training of staff.'