Gosport brewery which became a laundry awaits demolition

For our main photo today we head to Haslar Road, Gosport.

Monday, 6th March 2017, 6:00 am
Updated Friday, 24th March 2017, 10:51 am
DEMOLITION The former FLUX laundry in Haslar Road, Gosport awaiting demolition in 1958. Picture: Richard Hulse

This Portsmouth Evening News photograph shows the former FLUX laundry waiting for the demolition men.

I must admit to knowing very little about Gosport, but if you know more about this building or the laundry, please let me know.

Richard Hulse’s late father kept many cuttings which he passed on to Richard.

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STEAM On April 25, 1965 a diverted boat train from Southampton Docks roars through Bedhampton en route to Waterloo Picture: E Wilshurst

He tells me the building was Blake’s brewery before it became a laundry.

n As I have mentioned in previous Remember When pages, this coming July sees the 50th anniversary of the end of steam working on the South Western Division of British Railways.

I’m including a photograph from that period from time to time.

From 1965 until July 1967 the electrification of the main line from Woking to Bournemouth was taking place and many trains were diverted via Fareham and Havant to London Waterloo.

HOLD TIGHT A tram outside the church in Rugby Road, Southsea

Here we see a boat train from Southampton Docks roaring through Bedhampton on April 25, 1965.

Since that time the platforms at Bedhampton have been extended to take the modern sliding door trains.

n In the picture on the right we see a tram moving off from outside Rugby Road Church heading north for Fratton Bridge.

The church has since been converted into living accommodation in this very busy part of Southsea.

CLICKETY-CLACK A typist in the 1920s. Imagine sitting in that chair all day?

n Take a look around your office at all the people bashing away at their computer keyboards and listen for any sound.

There isn’t much noise is there?

Back in the days of the typewriter of course there would have been a deafening racket from the clackety-clack of dozens of typists, usually women.

Below we see a young typist from the 1920s working on a heavy typewriter which would have done her fingertips and nails little good I would have thought.

STEAM On April 25, 1965 a diverted boat train from Southampton Docks roars through Bedhampton en route to Waterloo Picture: E Wilshurst

Today’s office worker is usually provided with ergonomic chairs, nothing like the rigid, hard one on which this young woman is sitting.

HOLD TIGHT A tram outside the church in Rugby Road, Southsea
CLICKETY-CLACK A typist in the 1920s. Imagine sitting in that chair all day?