37 Amazing images from D Day 1944 Normandy

IT WAS the biggest amphibious invasion forces ever sent to war.

Wednesday, 24th April 2019, 3:35 pm
Updated Wednesday, 24th April 2019, 3:38 pm
Picture released on June 5, 1944 of the British troops embarking at Southsea, Portsmouth in England, before a landing craft on June 6, 1944 while Allied forces storm the Normandy beaches on D-Day.  / AFP PHOTO / AFP PHOTO AND Imperial War Museum / (Photo credit should read -/AFP/Getty Images)
Picture released on June 5, 1944 of the British troops embarking at Southsea, Portsmouth in England, before a landing craft on June 6, 1944 while Allied forces storm the Normandy beaches on D-Day. / AFP PHOTO / AFP PHOTO AND Imperial War Museum / (Photo credit should read -/AFP/Getty Images)

And as the world comes towards marking the 75th anniversary of the Normandy landings, The News is sharing these amazing photos that capture the event as it unfolded.

Taking place on June 6, the D-Day landings turned the tide of the war and involved more than 100,000 Allied troops – many of whom set sail from Portsmouth.

The mission to invade Normandy and liberate the French from Nazi rule was planned in Southwick and codenamed Operation Overlord.

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Infantry Advances 9th August 1944: US infantrymen make their way past a wrecked German truck on the way to Avranches during the Allied invasion of Normandy. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

The landings themselves, more commonly known as D-Day, were codenamed Operation Neptune.

Landing Craft 6th June 1944: A landing craft bound for Normandy. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Survivors Ashore 6th June 1944: Survivors from a landing craft which sank off Omaha Beach, Normandy, come safely ashore on a life raft. (Photo by Weintraub/Keystone/Getty Images)
6th June 1944: American assault troops wading ashore on Omaha beachhead in Normandy. (Photo by Fox Photos/Getty Images)
Convoy To Normandy June 1944: Members of the 9th Air Force watch a long line of landing craft carrying barrage balloons, on their way over to Normandy. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
1944: American writer Ernest Hemingway (1899 - 1961) travelling with US soldiers, in his capacity as war correspondent, on their way to Normandy for the D-Day landings. (Photo by Central Press/Getty Images)
D-Day Bombers 7th June 1944: Bomber crews of the US Ninth Airforce leave their B26 Marauder aircraft after returning from a mission to support the D-Day landings in Normandy by disrupting German lines of communication and supply. (Photo by Fred Ramage/Keystone/Getty Images)
Normandy Landings 6th June 1944: American medics administer first aid to wounded soldiers on Utah beach in Normandy, France, whilst in the background other troops 'dig-in' in the soft sand. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Reinforcements. Paratroopers give the thumbs-up signal, before leaving in a glider to drop on Normandy as reinforcements to the invasion forces. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Asleep In A Trench 1944: An American GI asleep in a trench in Normandy. (Photo by Three Lions/Getty Images)
Paratroopers Relax. US paratroopers of the 82nd Airborne Division relaxing after liberating the village of Sainte-Mere-Eglise in Normandy, during World War II, 8th June 1944. The shoulder patch of the nearest standing soldier has been erased, presumably by the censors. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
Juno Beach D-Day Landings. Troops from the 48th Royal Marines at Saint-Aubin-sur-mer on Juno Beach, Normandy, France, during the D-Day landings, 6th June 1944. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Normandy Beachhead 14th July 1944: Fleets of US transport and landing craft disgorge reinforcements and supplies for the US troops who liberated the Contentin peninsula, the deep-water port of Cherbourg and the communication centre of La Haye du Puits. Barrage balloons float overhead as protection against German strafing aeroplanes, which did not appear. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
Normandy Troops 14th June 1944: Reinforcements disembark from a landing craft, aboard a Bren Gun Carrier newly arrived in Normandy from Britain. (Photo by Reg Speller/Fox Photos/Getty Images)
British Commandos 6th June 1944: British commandos who landed in Normandy on 6th June set out to capture a Nazi gun site, which is protected by enemy snipers. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
Invasion Embarkation 6th June 1944: American soldiers on a landing craft on their way to the Normandy beaches, during the invasion of Europe. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
Troops To France 6th June 1944: British troops on their way to Normandy to take part in the D-Day landings. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
Pedal Power 6th June 1944: Troops of the Canadian 3rd Division, leaving their ship with their bicycles, at Juno beach along the coast of Normandy, France on D-Day. (Photo by G. Milne/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
D-Day Convoy. A convoy of Allied landing craft, protected by barrage balloons, crosses the English Channel on its way to France during the Normandy Landings, World War II, 6th June 1944. The craft are carrying ground support personnel and equipment of the US 9th Air Force. (Photo by Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
No Time To Paddle 6th June 1944: US Assault Troops seen here landing on Omaha beach during the Invasion of Normandy. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
Over The Wall 9th June 1944: American troops advance over the crest of a concrete sea wall after the successful landings on Utah Beach in Normandy, France, whilst comrades shelter below. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
US LCVP 3rd June 1944: US troops board their Landing Craft Vehicle-Personnel at Torquay Hards, England, prior to landing on the Normandy coast. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
Embarkation March 6th June 1944: US Army troops seen marching through the streets of an embarkation port on the coast of England on their way over to Normandy, France. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
American infantrymen take aim at sniper positions SAINT-MALO, FRANCE - AUGUST 9: American infantrymen take aim at sniper positions 09 August 1944, during the house-to-house fighting in Saint-Malo, two months after the allied troops landed on Normandy beaches (north-west of France), to come as reinforcements during the historic D-Day, 06 June 1944, during WWII. AFP PHOTO STAFF (Photo credit should read STF/AFP/Getty Images)
August 1944: General George S Patton (1885 - 1945), Head of the 3rd Army, talks to Allied war correspondents in Normandy. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
Normandy Delivery 6th June 1944: Bombs are unloaded from a Norwegian merchant ship onto an American amphibious landing craft during the Invasion of Normandy by allied forces. (Photo by Keystone Features/Getty Images)
Evacuating Wounded June 1944: A serviceman wounded during the Allied landings is lifted on a stretcher onto a DC-4 Dakota in Normandy, bound for England. (Photo by Fox Photos/Getty Images)
Stubborn Sniper 7th June 1944: Soldiers try to flush out a German sniper located in a church in the centre of Sainte Mere Eglise, after the Normandy town's liberation. (Photo by Bob Landry/Keystone/Getty Images)
D-Day Landings 6th June 1944: One of the first pictures of the D-Day landings in Normandy, showing US jeeps and men landing on the French coast. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
The West Wall June 1944: Two German soldiers lean up against a wall on the outskirts of Sainte Mere Eglise, in Normandy, recently captured by the Americans. (Photo by Bob Landry/Keystone/Getty Images)
American Troops June 1944: American troop reinforcements embarking from a British port for the US beach heads in Normandy include Ernest Barker of Texas who carries his guitar into battle. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
(From left) British Prime minister Winston Churchill, Sir Miles Dempsey, British 2nd Army commandant, and British general Marshal Bernard Montgomery visit destroyed city of Caen, 23 July 1944 after Allied forces stormed the Normandy beaches on D-Day. D-Day, 06 June 1944 is still one of the world's most gut-wrenching and consequential battles, as the Allied landing in Normandy led to the liberation of France which marked the turning point in the Western theater of World War II. (Photo credit should read STF/AFP/Getty Images)
British soldiers joke as they read a tourist guide about France aboard a landing craft 06 June 1944 while Allied forces storm the Normandy beaches on D-Day. D-Day, 06 June 1944 is still one of the world's most gut-wrenching and consequential battles, as the Allied landing in Normandy led to the liberation of France which marked the turning point in the Western theater of World War II. / AFP PHOTO / STF (Photo credit should read STF/AFP/Getty Images)
Allied aircrews work around C-47 transport planes at an unidentified English base in this file photo taken shortly before the D-Day landings in Normandy, France. The C-47's dropped parachutists from the US 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions behind Utah Beach near Saint-Mere-Eglise 06 June 1944, during the first hours of Operation Overlord. AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read B/AFP/Getty Images)
British soldiers cross 08 June 1944 the village of Douet, after the town of Bayeux fell, after Allied forces stormed the Normandy beaches. D-Day, 06 June 1944 is still one of the world's most gut-wrenching and consequential battles, as the Allied landing in Normandy led to the liberation of France which marked the turning point in the Western theater of World War II. (Photo credit should read STF/AFP/Getty Images)