Flowvers at The Wedgewood Rooms, Southsea REVIEW: 'Their sound could catch the ears of the nation's youth'

Given that they've near enough sold out the Wedge themselves, it's a most pleasant bonus to catch Chichester's Dutch Criminal Record in support.

Sunday, 13th October 2019, 9:15 pm
Flowvers at The Wedgewood Rooms, Southsea, October 12, 2019. Picture by Paul Windsor

Their chiming guitars are redolent of ’80s indie at its finest, and it's good to hear that new music is on the horizon. Pay attention to these guys if quality indie is your thing.

Headliners Flowvers take to the stage with a throbbing, grooving, instrumental, and it's soon clear this young crowd belongs to them.

From there the Portsmouth-based four-piece charge straight into the first song they ever released, Fresh Air, and then there's a rather sweet 'don't do drugs' public service message before Nose Bleed.

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Flowvers at The Wedgewood Rooms, Southsea, October 12, 2019. Picture by Paul Windsor

There's plenty of teenage love and lust and its many variables on display in their songs, which given the fact the band are still all teenagers themselves, is understandable.

Frontman Matisse Moretti is not short of confidence, particularly when bolstered by this incredibly partisan hometown crowd – mosh pits erupt on a regular basis.

Recent single She Don't Talk About It, with its massive earworm of a chorus, gets, a little surprisingly, played mid-set, provoking a huge audience response.

There's a couple of new songs thrown in to the mix which stick to the muscular indie formula. Guitarist Stanley Powell throws around some impressive licks.

When they come back for the inevitable encores, we're told how tonight is being filmed for a video, and She Don't Talk About It gets another, extended outing – which is gleefully lapped up by the audience, given the even more frenzied response than first time around.

The band are starting to stretch their legs beyond Portsmouth, and it's easy to see how, with a fair tailwind, their sound could catch the ears of the nation's youth.