Coronavirus: Portsmouth woman, 99, thanks Queen Alexandra Hospital staff after recovering from Covid-19 and returning home

AFTER three weeks in hospital battling coronavirus, a 99-year-old woman has thanked ‘amazing’ staff for helping her to return home.

By Millie Salkeld
Saturday, 4th April 2020, 9:20 am
Updated Saturday, 4th April 2020, 9:26 am
Carrie Pollock, 99, Hayling Island, recovered from Covid-19 after care at QA hospital.



Pictured is: Carrie Pollock at QA after recovering from Covid-19.



Picture: Queen Alexandra Hospital
Carrie Pollock, 99, Hayling Island, recovered from Covid-19 after care at QA hospital. Pictured is: Carrie Pollock at QA after recovering from Covid-19. Picture: Queen Alexandra Hospital

Carrie Pollock, who lives on Hayling Island, was admitted to Queen Alexandra Hospital in the first week of March with hallucinations, a water infection and suspected pneumonia.

After a temperature spike, Carrie, who has limited vision due to macular degeneration, was tested and her family’s worst fears were confirmed when a doctor phoned to tell them she had tested positive for Covid-19.

Peggy Hitchcock, whose husband William was Carrie’s nephew, said: ‘We didn’t want her to go into hospital as we were quite worried but the staff were absolutely amazing and couldn’t have done more for her.

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Carrie Pollock when she was younger.

‘We visited her every day when she was being treated for her hallucinations and pneumonia but when the doctor called to tell us she had Covid-19, we were devastated because we couldn’t see her and worried we wouldn’t again. For her it was horrible as well as she is nearly blind but blow me down she is still going.’

Carrie, who was a former special branch police officer in Kenya and British Embassy employee in Malawi, is believed to be the oldest person in the UK to recover from Covid-19.

She has also previously battled malaria twice.

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Carrie Pollock, 99, Hayling Island, recovered from Covid-19 after care at QA hospital. Pictured is: Copy picture of Carrie Pollock cutting her wedding cake with husband, William Pollock, in Nairobi, 1956.

Carrie, who has no children, returned to the home she shares with Peggy last Thursday and is relaxing at home with her talking books.

She told The News: ‘I am so grateful to the hospital staff. They were so kind and now I am doing very well.’

Peggy’s granddaughter Jess Keeley said: ‘She is an absolute fighter and we are so proud that she has done so well. She is already back at home and walking to strengthen her legs again.

‘She loves her talking books and loves a natter. She is an inspiration to our whole family. The hospital staff did an amazing job to care for her and nothing was too much trouble. We were able to call her when she was in isolation which was lovely.’

Karen Clarke, senior sister, said: ‘It was wonderful to see Carrie going home to her family as they had all really missed each other. These are worrying times for many and to see her leaving hospital after recovering from Covid-19 gave the staff a real boost.’

Peggy, 73, added: ‘Carrie is like a mother to me because I came from such a big family.

‘She helped me make my bridesmaid dresses for my wedding and she has always been there for me. I can’t thank the staff enough for how they treated her and I think they are all angels.’

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