Two-hour cycle by 8-year-old will raise money for NHS as thanks for brain surgery care

A YOUNG boy hopes to give something back to medical staff after years of hospital treatment including major brain surgery at the age of six.

Thursday, 14th May 2020, 4:30 pm
Updated Friday, 15th May 2020, 1:43 pm

Eight-year-old Shay Glenton will cycle for two hours straight on Friday, May 14, to raise money for University Hospital Southampton - a huge challenge for him which would have never seemed possible a few years ago.

Shay, from Lee-on-the-Solent, began having seizures at 18 months old before being diagnosed with cortical dysplasia and epilepsy, leading to major brain surgery in July 2018 to remove his left temporal lobe.

Mum Gemma said Shay started to recover well despite warnings about possible effects of the procedure, before more sad news came to light.

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Shay Glenton, 8 from Lee-on-the-Solent, will be cycling for two hours straight to raise money for University Hospital Southampton which has cared for him since his diagnosis of epilepsy and subsequent brain surgery. Pictured: Shay's head following his surgery

‘At his six week post-op appointment with the surgeon we were met in the waiting room with a nurse handing us a cancer research leaflet and a permission slip for Shay's biopsy to be used and stored in Newcastle for further testing to help cancer research,’ said Gemma.

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Baffled by this request, Gemma and husband Ben were then told by the surgeon that surgery discovered a brain tumour - which had been removed, but would mean hospital visits would continue throughout Shay’s life.

The family recently heard the most recent MRI showed very little change so they can have a break from frequent scans and testing.

Shay Glenton, 8 from Lee-on-the-Solent, will be cycling for two hours straight to raise money for University Hospital Southampton which has cared for him since his diagnosis of epilepsy and subsequent brain surgery. Pictured: Shay outside the hospital

Shay and his family want to give a massive thanks to the NHS, particularly to Southampton staff who have cared for the Crofton Hammond Junior School pupil.

‘When Shay suggested he'd like to cycle for two hours I did think it would be hard for him as he has never gone far or for long before without complaining he's tired, but I'm sure he will finish it,’ said Gemma.

‘We are truly thankful for all the help and support that the staff gave us and this is Shay's little way to say thank you.

‘He wasn't allowed to cycle for a year after surgery so when he got on his bike again he was a bit wobbly but he always loved cycling and he is looking forward to his little challenge.’

Shay Glenton, 8 from Lee-on-the-Solent, will be cycling for two hours straight to raise money for University Hospital Southampton which has cared for him since his diagnosis of epilepsy and subsequent brain surgery. Pictured: Shay being scanned as a young child

To donate, visit justgiving.com/fundraising/shay-glenton3 or to learn more about Shay’s journey visit facebook.com/pg/Shaysbattle.

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Shay Glenton, 8 from Lee-on-the-Solent, will be cycling for two hours straight to raise money for University Hospital Southampton which has cared for him since his diagnosis of epilepsy and subsequent brain surgery. Pictured: Shay cycling to see HMS Queen Elizabeth

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