27 images of the raising of The Mary Rose and artefacts recovered

Mary Rose sank in 1545. She was to be the flagship of King Henry VIII’s fleet and was a new breed of Tudor warship with purpose-built gun-ports.

Monday, 19th April 2021, 5:47 pm
A fantastic illustration of the Royal Navy Flagship The Mary Rose at sea
A fantastic illustration of the Royal Navy Flagship The Mary Rose at sea

An eyewitness said that she had fired all of her guns on one side and was turning when she was caught in a strong gust of wind causing her to sink in the Solent whilst leading 60 ships against the French.

The wreck of the Mary Rose was discovered in 1971 and was raised on 11 October 1982 by the Mary Rose Trust. The surviving section of the ship and thousands of recovered artefacts now sit in The Mary Rose Museum for us all to enjoy.

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The Mary Rose team involved in the dive.

There may have been 700 men on board the Mary Rose when she sank, of which fewer than 40 survived. There have been 27,831 dives made to the Mary Rose during the main excavation, that’s 22,710 hours on the seabed. 60 million people worldwide watched the wreck being raised live on television.

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Diver Peter Ewens and Mrs Margaret Rule with the Watch bell from The Mary Rose
Lifting underway. The raising of The Mary Rose.
Cowdray Engraving showing The Mary Rose. The Cowdray Engraving shows the sinking of the Mary Rose and the events of the Battle of the Solent!
The Mary Rose in the cradle on the barge.
Prince Charles - raising of the Mary Rose
An aerial shot of the giant Tog Mor crane lowering the Mary Rose onto her barge on October 11, 1982. The News PP3739
The Mary Rose in its cradle being brought ashore by a barge in October 1982. The News PP3741
Alexander McKee set out for the Spithead site of The Mary Rose
Diver investigating the wreck. Picture: The Mary Rose Trust
Artist impression of ship in 1545. The Mary Rose Trust tell us they are both The Mary Rose. Painting W.H. Bishop.
Prince Charles inspecting a metal powder cask, one of the items recovered recently from the Mary Rose in 1980.
The raising of the Mary Rose
Conservators work on the remains of the Mary Rose at the new Mary Rose Museum at Portsmouth's Historic Dockyard on May 16, 2013. Picture: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
Prince Charles with Dr Margaret Rule checking progress on the Mary Rose in 1986. Picture: The News img1875
'Henry VIII' at the Mary Rose Museum in Portsmouth Historic Dockyard.
The Crow's Nest is exhibited in the new Mary Rose Museum at Portsmouth's Historic Dockyard on May 29, 2013. Picture: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
Personal items discovered. Picture: The Mary Rose Trust
More interesting artefacts that were brought to the surface. Picture: The Mary Rose Trust.
Guns of The Mary Rose.
Items recovered from the wreck of the Mary Rose are exhibited in the new Mary Rose Museum at Portsmouth's Historic Dockyard on May 29, 2013. Picture: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
Maintenance Coordinator Brian Robinson poses next to a canon recovered from the wreck of the Mary Rose in the new Mary Rose Museum at Portsmouth's Historic Dockyard on May 16, 2013. Picture: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
Henry VIII's warship, the Mary Rose after a £5.4m museum revamp on July 19, 2016. The ship, which was raised from the Solent in 1982, was launched in Portsmouth in 1511 and sank in 1545 at the Battle of the Solent. Picture: Olivia Harris/Getty Images
Gold coins recovered from the wreck of the Mary Rose are exhibited in the new Mary Rose Museum at Portsmouth's Historic Dockyard on May 29, 2013. Picture: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
Conservators work on the remains of the Mary Rose at the new Mary Rose Museum at Portsmouth's Historic Dockyard on May 16, 2013. Picture: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
The Mary Rose being lifted out of the harbour by the Tog Mor in October 1982. The News PP3740